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Pretty map, but what does it mean practically? All this imagery is great and all, but what are the actionable recommendations that come out of it? In particular I mean these two maps in particular.

I understand the theory behind imaging. Hotspot identification, etc. But in practice, the benefits are murky for most producers. On your map, obviously a farmer's going to know that the low spots have more moisture, and those areas will ripen last, as seen in the NDVI-R image.

As an agronomist has it helped you to make money-making recommendations?
 

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I have some ideas on how one could calibrate a probe (I have a couple of Vegitronix probes to experiment with some time). I read a paper once that indicated that if you graph the VWC value over time, when the soil is over saturated, the slope of the line is steaper while the water runs through the soil. Once saturation hits 100% field capacity or below, it starts to change at a shallower slow. They postulated if you could identify that change in slope point, that would be your 100% field capacity line. But I'm not sure the slope is linear.

We probe our fields all the time with a Dutch auger and hand check the moisture. Those observations could help calibrate it I suppose. Although I doubt I'm all that accurate with my observations.

(Basically I have no idea)

Looks like this system just has preset charts they apply when you tell it your soil type:
The Ultimate Guide to Soil Moisture - ConnectedCrops. But they don't tell what the raw curve looks like. Sadly my sandy loam soil holds half the water that good soil holds!
 
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