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Heard you can strip a wire and wrap it around discharge pipe, then plug into ground of household electrical plug and will heat the pipe enough to unthaw it. Heard it works just never tried it and want to make sure I have my info straight. Have tried hot water and takes too long. Been away and assuming froze a day or 2.
 

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Heard you can strip a wire and wrap it around discharge pipe, then plug into ground of household electrical plug and will heat the pipe enough to unthaw it. Heard it works just never tried it and want to make sure I have my info straight. Have tried hot water and takes too long. Been away and assuming froze a day or 2.
sounds electrifying , Dont no for sure but i would think the pipe being thicker and larger than the wire, would cause the wire leading to the pipe to overheat and fuse out ?. Have used 12 volt batteries to heat things with wire and item to be heated between the terminals, but never a frozen pipe.
 

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On metal or copper pipe, I have several times thawed them out using a small welder. Replace the stinger with a ground clamp. Simply place one welding clamp on each end of the frozen pipe and turn on. Low voltage will always get the job done. Too high will bubble the solder out of joints. 50 foot pipe in mobile home floor will take about 2 hrs when set on 40.
 

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Good thing that you mentioned metal/copper pipes! Looks like most of us are assuming metal/copper, but some form of plastic is always a possibility as well.

Andrew
 

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On a vertical run like that you can put about a pound of salt inside the pipe. The salt water will have a heavier density and keep moving down onto the ice below as the ice melts into fresh water. It only takes a few hours because underground temperatures aren't much below freezing.

To thaw it faster get a 5 gallon gas jug full of very hot water, the closer to boiling the better. Attach a long enough hose to the jug, and keep forcing it down the pipe against the ice as you dump the jug.
 

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To thaw it faster get a 5 gallon gas jug full of very hot water, the closer to boiling the better. Attach a long enough hose to the jug, and keep forcing it down the pipe against the ice as you dump the jug.
A friend of mine who does sewers and such built a gizmo that takes that one step further. Has a packing type fitting that attaches to the end of the water line, then the hose goes thru it and he is able to circulate hot water or alcohol thru the line and it returns out the packing fitting. Besides a pump to circulate with, he has a little propane fired boiler to hook up to it for the hot water. While I have never needed it, I have seen it in use thawing a water line froze under a driveway.

As for the OPs situation, I'm drawing a blank at exactly what it is that is froze...maybe my brain is too, just got in from my chores and dam its cold here this morning:eek:
 

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If you live in oil and gas country call a steam truck. I had a cattle waterer severly frozen up this winter and got one in. Took him about an hour to thaw everything(big tire waterer frozen solid). The bill was a couple hundred bucks but worth every penny.
 

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I have a pressure water tip that propels the nozzle forward with 2 jets going backwards and one going forward, with hot water it will go thru the line quickly.
 

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I have a pressure water tip that propels the nozzle forward with 2 jets going backwards and one going forward, with hot water it will go thru the line quickly.
That is the way the pro's do it! But seriously , if you still have water pressure from your hot water tank, and can access one end of a frozen water line, just hot water running out of a 1/4" plastic airline and being pushed gently toward the ice will cut the ice out quite fast. You can feel the plastic hose cut its way into the ice as you keep pressure on it. For 1" or larger plastic lines I would use 1/2" polyethylene hose.If it is a metal line it should work also. I have seen the welder instructions before also, for metal lines. I think a portable DC welder was supposed to work very well for that purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
On a vertical run like that you can put about a pound of salt inside the pipe. The salt water will have a heavier density and keep moving down onto the ice below as the ice melts into fresh water. It only takes a few hours because underground temperatures aren't much below freezing.

To thaw it faster get a 5 gallon gas jug full of very hot water, the closer to boiling the better. Attach a long enough hose to the jug, and keep forcing it down the pipe against the ice as you dump the jug.
Figured out quickest way. Went to neighbors and filled a new 2.5 gallon jerry can with hot water and salt. Unscrewed hydrant, opened handle and poured down. Took 5 min or more to pour it in. Screwed hydrant on and within 15 min had water. Stupid but never thought of unscrewing hydrant. Just always poured on outside of tube and worked before
 
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