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In hearing all the speculation about which machines are best balanced weight wise and the assumptions being made based on feelings and emotions its seems it's time for a little good old fashioned hard reasoning to settle these issues. In regard to how much weight is removed from the rear axle of any combine and how much weight is added to the front axle when a header of any kind is picked up is as follows. Let the combines wheel base be 'A', the length of the feeder house face to the center of the front axle be 'B', The weight of the head be 'M', the weight removed from the rear axle 'R', the weight added to the front axle be 'F', and the center of balance of the head be 'H'. The formula to calculate the amount of weight removed from the rear axle and the weight added to the front axle is as follows. [{B+H}/A] x M=R. In the case of the average gleaner 5 series, B is @73", A=134", and in the case of using a 12-30 hugger header for illustration that weights in at 8800 lbs, and has an approximate center of gravity about 19" forward of the mounting surface and plugging these numbers into the formula, I calculate that it removes 6042 lbs from the rear axle when lifted. To then calculate the amount of weight this adds to the front simply add this weight to the 8800 lbs and the total weight added to the front axle is 14,842 lbs. Now lets simply add 12" inches to 'B' to illustrate how the longer feeder houses used by other combines changes this weight. Keeping the wheel base number the same as well as the head weight the same, the weight removed from the rear axle would increase to 6830lbs and the added weight on the front axle would increase to15,629. Long feeder houses are a killer when it comes to added weight to the front axle and the amount removed from the rear. Now anyone can take the numbers from other combines and plug them into the formula to estimate the weight distribution changes caused by the addition of a header. The variable in the equation will always be 'H' which is the center of gravity of the head and its distance ahead of the feeder house mating surface. I'm sure the manufacturers know these numbers but don't publish them to my knowlege. The formula clearly shows that the farther forward this center of gravity is the more weight is removed from the rear axle and shifted to the front. If anyone has any corrections or additions to add to this, please do.
 

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I've been waiting for some John Deere or Case guy to reply and try to work resale value into that formula. Somehow that would make their combines lighter in the field and better balanced. LOL!
 

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Evidently the Case, Deere, and Cat guys got out their calculators and tape measures and are hanging their heads in disbelief. Just like the old cartoon with Foghorn Leghorn "But boy, it can't be!!!!"
 

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Yeah, some where on this site someone said that the Gleaner was lighter on the rear axle so the RWD would not have any effect on traction. How can that be with the rotor at the back of the machine?
 

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As a deere owner in a dry country I can absolutely assure you that I haven't had my tape measure out, or thought about re-sale, or even given a rat s hit about weight distribution of a gleaner..
 

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Bundybear, you may not have had your tape measure out or thought of resale, but by reading this thread you are thinking about combine weight distribution since that is the title of the thread and you are thinking about a Gleaner since that is the forum you are on. If you don't give a rat spit then why did you even post a comment?

Harsh you are right on. Rotor at the back and shorter feederhouse means more weight left on the back axle for 4 wd traction.
 

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I am intrigued by the super 7, and last time I checked anyone could visit any forum. Just wanted to let you know that one deere owner wasn't "hanging his head in dis-belief".
 

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Why do you worry about the weight of the rotor? Our R62 total weight is only 2000 pounds more that the weight of the header and a loaded bin of grain.

You can adjust the location of the front axle to change the weight distribution, not just the length of the feeder house.

Ask someone with a 12 row head on a Case about weight distribution.
 

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There are alot of things that make a combine a good value to a farmer, and I can honestly say that weight distribution is WAY down the list.
We run a 9770 and I have the proper rubber to mitigate compaction the best I can. What good is all this talk of weight distribution and then turn around and put on some crappy Firestone bias ply tires...now THAT makes no sense.
We run Michelin 1050's in the front at 16psi and 750's in the rear with 10psi. If I were to do it again I would put on the new 650 axiobib duals and could run 12psi in the front.
Weight distribution is nearly a moot point IMHO.
 

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Front axle weight a moot point?----so nobody running the big dog combines gives a rats tail about the super heavy axle loads and the long term deep soil compaction they are doing to their record high priced land? hmmmmm
Just what is the total axle loads of a S670 with a 45" header loaded to the max with 63# wheat?
 

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You could park a separator in the field and bring sheaves to it with horses, it's been tried before. I can't see the difference between a combine that weighs half as much with half the tires and half the header as compared to one that's double in every aspect.

As for deep compaction in an aggregate material, that's very much a pyramid shape bearing area and becomes rather massive with depth. IMO
 

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Any STS with 300 bu and 800 singles leaves a rutted/compacted mess in fields. In 2007, 2010 that was amplified much more due to the MUD.
Every combine needs duals to carry the grain plus itself. Grain carts compact way less than those running tandems in the fields. In the wet years they could not even get into fields here.
 
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