The Combine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 182 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering an R65, it's a customers unit with about 1400 sep hours and 1900 engine hours. Clean, well-maintained and it's an "okay" deal compared to comparable units on the market. What's driving me towards this particular combine is knowing its history and the fact that the customer is only dealing on another Gleaner to gain more capacity, duals and 4WD. My question is what motivates some long-term Gleaner owners to switch brands? In SW Ontario, you seldom see another colour on a Gleaner lot but I've noticed some late model gleaners on the other colours lots. I harvest corn, winter wheat and soys; - about 400 acres each, give or take each year. I'd particularly like to hear the reasoning from those who have owned 2 or 3 gleaners and have switched brands. FYI - dealer support is excellent in my area.
 

·
Ooohhh Deere
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
Usually parts and dealer support is the only down side.

I think dealers don’t get the support they need from Mother AGCO either.

My exp in OZ.........

Great big huge lumpy tough Canola might be the reason some Silver guys turn to another colour over in your country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,798 Posts
Downside? It’s a gleaner!!

Feederhouse to narrow.
Residue management is the shits.
Plug the cylinder your pulling crap out almost in an enclosed pocket.
If you really plug it a gleaner guy with a straight face will say it’s quicker to pull the cylinder out of the side of the machine. Likely is.
Rotor rumble in green stems
Tiny sieve area
Chinese bearings
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Downside? It’s a gleaner!!

Feederhouse to narrow.
Residue management is the shits.
Plug the cylinder your pulling crap out almost in an enclosed pocket.
If you really plug it a gleaner guy with a straight face will say it’s quicker to pull the cylinder out of the side of the machine. Likely is.
Rotor rumble in green stems
Tiny sieve area
Chinese bearings
I will agree with you on every point but the last one. The axials get the same bearings and all in all they are pretty good. The bearings in the the Macdon built pickup are another story......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
866 Posts
and it's an "okay" deal compared to comparable units on the market.

What's driving me towards this particular combine is knowing its history and the fact that the customer is only dealing on another Gleaner to gain more capacity, duals and 4WD.
What are the other comparable units you’re looking at?
(It’ll help give people a sense of how much capacity you think you need).

And as phantom said, others may have traded off bc they needed more capacity/better ability to handle tough lumpy canola(?) than they thought their gleaners could give them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Downside? It’s a gleaner!!

Feederhouse to narrow.
Residue management is the shits.
Plug the cylinder your pulling crap out almost in an enclosed pocket.
If you really plug it a gleaner guy with a straight face will say it’s quicker to pull the cylinder out of the side of the machine. Likely is.
Rotor rumble in green stems
Tiny sieve area
Chinese bearings
Feeder house too narrow? who determined this? it's not a problem..


Agree on the residue management... at least on the older ones


Plugged rotor (its not a cylinder) drop it into low gear and wind it through.


Really plugged ? pull the rotor out the side. a lot faster than trying to dig out a cylinder or rotor in other machines


Chinese bearings.. aren't they all using them now?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,083 Posts
Hear’s a thread with some good unplugging techniques for another brand that are interesting.

I actually found that an old Gleaner rotary can be reversed reasonably easy if it’s badly plugged by taking out the two anchor bolts on the back of the concave since there is room and access doors just ahead of the engine. You don’t need an aluminum ladder to get up there because it has a fold down stairs.;);)

https://www.thecombineforum.com/forums/12-claas-lexion/196161-unplugging-aps.html
.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
if this thread goes very long I suspect there will be some pretty precious comments about how the rarest combine in north America is gonna run circles around everything else.


the army is small but its loud!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
if this thread goes very long I suspect there will be some pretty precious comments about how the rarest combine in north America is gonna run circles around everything else.


the army is small but its loud!!!!!
An estimated 3.4 million tons of bombs were dropped by the allies in WWII, but Hiroshima was flattened with just one 10,000 POUND Fat Man! ;-)

I appreciate all who have responded, I think I've got my answers. From what I can gather, capacity seems to be an issue if you're going much beyond Class 7; - I'm not. All I want to push is 6-rows narrow (160 bushel +/-), 25' flex head (45 bushel beans/90 bushel winter wheat +/-) I can see where the intake to the rotor is a little hard to reach but, as mentioned, the rotor can be pulled quite quickly and easily, that is, if you can't throw it in low and slug it out; - no big deal. I like the simplicity, the weight and the serviceability of the machine. It's gotta be simple to work for me! ;-)

Thanks everyone! Cheers!
 

·
Ooohhh Deere
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
I used to run a couple of old R72’s.
Man they would go.........

Guess there’s still abit of Silver passion in the red blood.......

It seems you can look past our Sh-t stirring comments nocolourpreference and go with your gut. The 65 will serve you well. There’s a few mods you could do over the winters to come if you wanted to pimp it up abit.
The answers are all here in TCF.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
Buy it you will like it. If you enjoy buying fuel and getting it up the ass doing a green light then buy a pretty one. They are about the only make out there now that you can actually do all the maintenance at home everything is easily accessible. Very low compaction, low Center of gravity, you don’t need a ladder to service them, and very easy on fuel. Feeder house and straw management no longer a issue. Keep the accelerator rolls in good shape and shoe loss will be very low and sample won’t be beat by any other brand. Bearings? When did the USA become part of China?
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 182 Posts
Top