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Well to each his own. I've never seen a case head sweep the ground or flex better than a deere,there are even some farmers around here that have ran 930's on their 2388s & some of those same farmers want the deere 600 hydra-flex on the 8010, so go figure. When we are done cutting a crop,it seems like someone has been out in the field with a broom. I' ve never like the case heads, & have never liked the short feederhouse on the earlier Case combines...made the head to close to the cab...glad they fixed that with the 8010's. but to each his own...both are good machines though..hey I like the 8010... a little.... Merry Christmas everyone!!!
 

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I also think that the new Cat/MF/Agco combine is where the secret is, going forward. I'm curious how many of the teething problems it will have, compared to what the 8010 went through the past few years.

To me, I see Deere similar to Microsoft. They both have had very few new ideas recently. However, they are both very good at seeing what the competition is doing, using their concepts to build something new, and improve on it where people have complaints about the existing thing. Kind of like that 3M phrase... We don't make stuff, we make stuff better.

-Lance
 

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Fatdaddy,you must be a young fellow,because you don't know your combine history well.....first of all, Deere had the cab in the center of the combine & the engine in the rear FIRST,on the 45,55,95,105 combines......then they put the cab on the left side & the engine in the front on the 4400,6600,7700,6620,7720,8820,combines,when the 9000 series combines came out, Deere went back to their roots.....learn your history before you make comments on things that you don't know about.....I never said Deere was great at everything,but if you are going to tell a story, tell it right......HAVE A MERRY CHRISTMAS..... STSMAN
 

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Also,Fatdaddy did you know that deere had the adjustable combine settings in Europe waaay before they put them on the DEERE American combines,even before the Case 8010s.etc... came out,not sayimg Deere was first but they had e'm.... Did you know Deere filed for the rotor back in 1955,but stop development on it,but I wouldn't call none of this copying another brand,etc..it's progression,what I call copying is the MX magnum design off of Deere 8000series tractors...thats the best ever in history of copying..the Deere chasis & layout was ALL THE WAY THEIRS....Ray Charlres could see the MX Magnum guys got they thoughts from the 8000series. You say Deere have little true first for the Ag industry,again you talk what you don't know...but the ones they do have are history making...one is the known POWERSHIFT.
I love green ... true enough,but I will admit Case,etc have better ideas in certain areas also...I just tell it like it is....
 

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Not sure if this will be like putting more fuel on the fire or it will just put it out completely... :

In Europe, Claas was the first with sieve adjustments from the cab (lexion series) - think it came in the summer 2001 whereas the Deere's didn't have that before the following season...

Support to Lance: I think he's got the right idea/impression about Deere...


- Peter
 

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Re: What do you think? A bit of Deere history

Okay, first of all, I really love Lance's analogy. He hit the nail on the head there.
To clarify the John Deere combine issue, the Model 55 was inroduced in 1947. Yes, the Model 55, not the Model 45, was Deere's first self-propelled combine. The Model 45 came out in 1954 and was Deere's first real corn combine. It had a 2-row corn header. Deere was the first company to build a commercially-successful corn head! The Model 95 was introduced in 1958 and was just a hair smaller than the IHC 181, introduced 1 year earlier. In their day, a combine with a 40 or 41-inch cylinder was HUGE!


Two years later, John Deere debuted their Model 105 and it was indisputably the world's largest combine. It had a 50-inch cylinder. Deere's New Generation or "00 Series" introduced in 1970, was not only the first time a combine company simultaneously brought in an entire line of new production, but their Model 7700 was again, another world's largest combine!
By then, competing firms had made other combines even larger than the John Deere 105. The Massey-Ferguson Model 760 was introduced in 1971, athough commercial production did not begin until 1972. It was clearly the world's largest combine with its massive 60-inch cylinder.

When the John Deere 8820 came out in 1979, I just was blown away!
I never thought any combine could possibly ever beat the M-F 760's size! The J. D. Model 9600 was introduced in 1989. It had a larger diameter cylinder [same width] than the Model 8820. The walkers were longer and more separator features were added to increase capacity while staying within the 8820's prior height/width dimensions. The Model 9600 was no longer the largest combine in the world, but it was sure safe to say it was the world's largest CONVENTIONAL combine.


By the way, the Gleaner Model A was introduced in 1951. The company was also still pure Baldwin back then, too. Allis-Chalmers did not buy out Baldwin until 1955.


Fatdaddy is sure right about one thing. Combines are the single, most complex and technologically innovative machines on the farm, period. They are in fact, small, mobile, wheeled factories!
OMG, I LOVE them so much, too!
 

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Very well said, Jacob. I agree we can digress on the given advantages of this or that combine and its performance or lack thereof, without starting a big brawl over here. After all, that is why our combines are a little different from each other. If they were not different, they would all be just common "clones" sold by different firms and given respective colors. Once upon a time in combine history, exactly such did happen, although it only spanned 2 to 3 brand names in each case.

Personally, I enjoy the typical "coffee shop" discussions on combine comparison. It does add quite a bit of flavor to this forum, but once the punches begin, we will begin our own "bouncing."

Thank you, Jacob for your seconding The Grain Harvesters.
I have referred to that book many times, urging other combine aficianados they can settle any argument as to who did what, when and how much.
 
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