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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have anything but ideal growing weather and soil conditions. Seed into cold and wet ground. Inevitably have saturated soil for weeks in June. Clay soil that holds moisture, but compacts hard, giving issues in dry and wet weather. Hail, frost etc.

L120 has handled the stress much better than the 73 or 74 series Dekalb's the past 2 years. Regrowing after hail, recovering from water stress far better. patiently waiting for rain to come, rather than quit flowering during hot dry weather. Then after all that, have far less green seed, and therefore much easier to store.

I would like to keep alternating Liberty with RR varieties, especially on a cold wet spring/early summer like this. Are there other RR's that will perform like the Invigors? And be suitable to our short season? Lots of good things said about 1990, do their shorter season varieties behave similar? The 72-35 behaved more like the invigors, and had much lower green seeds, but it has been discontinued, smaller seeds, but far more pods, that seem to get time to fill as opposed to bigger seeds. 73-15 was a disaster, just shut down at the first sign of hot dry weather, and still had high green seed count. 73-45 has performed the best, but is a drastic difference right next to the L120, and high green seed. 74-44 first try this year. Looked very poor, but yeilded on par with everything else, but high greens seeds. This year was a good test of stress, extensive hail damage on multiple occasions, very cold and wet early, hot and dry for over a month to mid july, and killing frost and snow in early September.
 

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I would give the 7444 another shot. The one thing we have found is you can leave the 7444 stand and ripen longer with low shatter losses. When we swathed our 7444 it looked too ripe visually and the seeds were 75% colour change but we had very little shattering and zero green seed when we harvested. It also yielded far better than it looked which is always a nice surprise. I personally think most farms swath too green (including ourselves at times) and we really need to evaluate the yield/quality losses associated with that vs a small amount of shelling that could occur if we leave the crop another few days. We re growing L130 for the LL and 7444 for the RR acres next year again
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Haven't written off the 74 44 yet, not a fair year to compare. And it did yeild much better than it looked, but it that isn't saying much. You could see the ground in the good spots
 

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rr vs invigor

Guess every area is diff and you likely need to be looking for tests you believe in within your specific area. However, my own tests would suggest that anything dekalb would be my last choice in rr arena.
 

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We farm in west central Alberta and deal with the same clay soil you talk about. I agree 73-15 is not a good variety Here unless conditions are right which the last few years have been challenging here. 72-35 was a great canola for our area, L 120 does very well also. This year we grew some pioneer 43E03 and will be growing it again. Was seeded into cold wet soil, too much water in June, 2 hailstorms, heat, snow and early frost on it. Still yielded very well and greens were excellent, was a #1. Think it is well suited for our area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Last year I enquired about the 43E03, but couldn't find much info about it except someone much further east in prime grain land who had a test plot and said it didn't compare to the full season varieties. I do like the idea behind it, but was afraid it may act more like the 73-15 under stress and just quit early. Sounds like it is worth a try, thanks for the results. How did the flowering period compare to the longer season varieties?

I swore that I would never grow 73-15 again, at the first sign of stress it just shut down, which was doing what it was supposed to do I guess, being a short season variety. Neighbor a few miles away with different soil does very well with the 73-15.

What about Canterra or Brett Young varieties?

As for shattering, I've yet to see a problem with any of the varieties I've tried, and this year I left everything to straight cut, with virtually no shattering, but with the exception of the 74-44 everything has been such a thick, deep, tangled mat that there isn't much chance. So not really worrying about that in variety selection. Don't get much hot weather by the time canola is dry around here. Snow is much more likely than 30 above.

Forgot to add that I also grew a small amount of L252 this year. It was slower to start flowering than the L120, but finished comparably and was no noticeable difference by fall. But hail evened them up too. No worse for green seed either.
 

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I don't grow a lot of RR, but tried Canterra 1990. Also grew L252, 261,and 5440. The 1990 out yielded the 252 by a fair amount. It grew quite tall, but was nice to swath. It's rates as one of the top RR varieties in the seed guide. Will be growing it again in 15.
 

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1990 is not a short season though, is about 2-3 days longer than 5440. 6060 is also a good RR, but 4-5 days later. In a tight season, you probably will have green seed issues with 7444 or 7454. 44 is ok, 54 probably won't be sold after this year (that says a lot). V12 or VT530 is probably the earliest in this area beside the 44.

I find in real life (not looking at the book) that RR varieties are about 3-5 days later than L130/5440.
 

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I used to grow a lot of Pioneer varieties but I quit because they seemed to volunteer badly after. The last few years I have grown DeKalb varieties and they have done very well. Last year I had Syngenta's SY-4135 and I am very happy with it. Even with our shallow soils and a lot of heat in August it went around 50 bu/ac, one of the best yields I have ever had. Not sure what it's going to be like for volunteers yet though. I'll grow it again next year.
 

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I used to grow a lot of Pioneer varieties but I quit because they seemed to volunteer badly after. The last few years I have grown DeKalb varieties and they have done very well. Last year I had Syngenta's SY-4135 and I am very happy with it. Even with our shallow soils and a lot of heat in August it went around 50 bu/ac, one of the best yields I have ever had. Not sure what it's going to be like for volunteers yet though. I'll grow it again next year.
Glad to hear someone else had the same problem. Thought my Deere was really throwing over. Well it probably was but not that bad. Tried Pioneer a couple years but Dekalb works out better on my ground. I had great luck with 73-15 this year. I hated swathing the pioneer stuff but the Dekalb was a dream compared to it.
 

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Swathing depends a lot on the year and growing conditions. I grew 73-75 in both 2012 and 2013. In 2012 everything went fine, yielded in the high 40's and it was good to swath. In 2013 we got smoked on the hills with the spring rains. Think it was 5 inches followed about another 4" a week later. Roots were very shallow due to the wet spring and the July heat totally smoked it. Yields were down around 28 bu/ac and it was the worst swathing I had seen since the varieties we grew in the 80's due to all the dead plants. Overall I had good luck with the DeKalb varieties, but as mentioned above, everybody's growing conditions are different.
 

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Swathing depends a lot on the year and growing conditions. I grew 73-75 in both 2012 and 2013. In 2012 everything went fine, yielded in the high 40's and it was good to swath. In 2013 we got smoked on the hills with the spring rains. Think it was 5 inches followed about another 4" a week later. Roots were very shallow due to the wet spring and the July heat totally smoked it. Yields were down around 28 bu/ac and it was the worst swathing I had seen since the varieties we grew in the 80's due to all the dead plants. Overall I had good luck with the DeKalb varieties, but as mentioned above, everybody's growing conditions are different.
So true. Some years back grew 9553 from viterra which was a pioneer variety. It was tall and rank but yielded like crazy. Next year I got talked into growing Dekalb 7344. Stuff only grew 2 feet at the best and fell over but still did 40. Next 2 years I grew pioneer s52, h29, s52, and a secan rr op variety for comparison. Swore I would never use Dekalb again. I gave pioneer a good chance but those varieties just did not perform on my ground and my management or lack thereof. Heck the op stuff I used last year was maybe 5 bushels behind the Pioneer hybrids. Next guy you talk to has great luck with pioneer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
1990 is not a short season though, is about 2-3 days longer than 5440. 6060 is also a good RR, but 4-5 days later. In a tight season, you probably will have green seed issues with 7444 or 7454. 44 is ok, 54 probably won't be sold after this year (that says a lot). V12 or VT530 is probably the earliest in this area beside the 44.

I find in real life (not looking at the book) that RR varieties are about 3-5 days later than L130/5440.
That is interesting. In 2013, the L120 was way behind the dekalb for maturity. It just wouldn't quit growing. This year it was hard to tell.
 
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