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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi just trying to decide what size older machine to get for small acrage? I currently am cutting about 40 acres rye and a little corn most feilds are small maybe 8 acres largest is 15 different every year am using a 45eb now am looking at maybe a 4400 4420 6600 6620 any thoughts at what would be best?
largest platform that would be practical is probably 15 foot thanks steve.
 

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i usually cut around 200 acres a year with a 4420, 13 ft head 5 row narow corn head . think i am going to look at a 15 ft for beans this year thought. if given the chance i would and will some day up grade to a 6620 simply for the hyrostatic drive .but we have small fields and the little machine is in good shape and i get along well with it and most importantly its payed for!
 

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A 4420 is plenty of machine for those acres, so it comes down to what you can find around and for a fair price. There's a guy around here who used to do 800 acres/ year with a 4400. A few different crops, so the harvest season was spread out some. Hydrostat on the 6620 is a plus for sure. Consider how much shed room you have too. You are making the exact switch I made 2 years ago! Did you have a 2 row head for your 45 or didn't combine your corn?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yea I have a 3 row 235 corn head that works real well and a 10 foot grain platform but everything is getting a little worn and parts are getting scarce.i probably will still do my corn with the 45 for a while unless i can find a package deal that loks good .Thanks to everyone for thier input still looking for the most bang for my buck. Steve
 

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A 3 row head on a 45 must have made the old girl snort once in a while. That would be fun to watch / run though. We had a 40EB, but never had a corn head for it. What I found was a 4420 with 2000 hrs, 4 row corn head, and 13 ft platform package deal for around $15k. I do not necessarily believe I got a good deal, but it was close enough to home to drive it which saved potentially $1000's in shipping, and I liked the relatively low hours. It also had fresh receipts for about $5000+ worth of service in the tool box, so that helped the decision. I find it hard to believe that people are throwing away 7720's because they are "too small". That's amazing, and sad
 

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I don't think people are throwing away 7720's because they are too small. I'd say it's because 7720's are a 20-30 year old machine and they're well past their prime, I'm sure most of them are just plain shot. I've seen a lot of them that were shot a long time ago. They were good in their day, but that day has come and gone many moons ago.
 

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They're cheap to buy, but expensive as heck to maintain. Just comes with the territory of owning a machine that old. That's why they're being scrapped out. Not worth the time and money to keep fixing them up and keep them going most of the time.
 

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My CaseIH dealer has these on his lot. I don't know if this is expensive or not. They are combine only......

1983 John Deere 6620 Combine ? hrs. $12,500.00
1980 John Deere 7720 4WD Combine 3273 hrs. $10,800.00
1980 John Deere 7720 4WD Combine 4590 hrs. $9,000.00

They also have heads but I'm not good with the JD numbers to know what is what.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I found a fairly low houred 4400 that has mostly run wheat soybeans the augers look real good rasp bars and concave also are decent with a 13.5 platform .It looks like most maintaince was done well. barn kept and very affordable so I will figure to get a few years at least out of this machine while I keep my eyes open for an upgrade . Thanks to all for your comments Steve
 
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