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Quote:

i personally will never buy a brand new car ever.......

i always buy something a year or 2 old...

Its just a smarter buy

but some people have to buy new...








Quote:I honestly have nothing against buying a new vehicle. I just don't see why you would buy a new combine that small over a much larger capacity combine thats only a couple of years old, still in good shape; all for the same amount of money. There is no question on what I would do!


I totally agree with both of you, here. I would rather take a beating from Mike Tyson, than to have to have to put up with breaking in a brand-new and very green combine during the stringent demands of a custom harvest run. In fact, it's bad enough on the farm as well.


I personally would prefer a 2-3 year old, seasoned but well-cared for combine, just as Rother suggested, if I was actually in the market for buying such a combine. Otherwise, as others have pointed out, there are plenty of very inexpensive, but still cherry, older combines [10-20 years old] needing good homes, and these can be bought for a song, compared to brand-new small ones.


This is just my own opinion, but I do have a real issue with bringing in all those foreign and exotic makes/models to fill even a niche combine demand--only to see them broken down and eventually abandoned completely--due to lack of adequate parts and service.
In such cases [and there are plenty examples of it] the buyer never saves anything over the cost of any alternative here in North America, and just loses his/her whole investment.

Therefore, not only was a very bad deal for the combine itself, but for the FARMER as well!
 

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What's next for combines? I'm thinking the back axle is going to be beefed up so that it is nearly the same as the front axle, and the motor will be pushed back. Combine hoppers of 750 bushel will be common in 7-8 years. This will be necessary as capacity increases. With the current capacity of combines today in corn you already can have a full 400Bu hopper in 6 minutes or so. I'm also thinking that a 'quick attach' duals for combines will be developed, and that 4wd on a combine will soon become standard equipment. Also, as some seed growers have done, they might start basically running airlines all over the machine and putting a compressor on the motor. The seed growers that have done this literally clean the entire 'inards' of their combines in about 5 minutes without even getting dirty.
 

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Crazy, I can agree about those airlines. In fact, those can also be modified to run also to some other key points and be charged with CO2. This is also in case any fire should break out and can be instantly extinguished. Such a principle is already employed on aircraft.

As for the super hoppers, it would be best to not crush a combine's final drives under all that weight. Instead, for those wanting such bin capacity, it would be best to have the hopper as part of an articulated configuration. I do agree a big combine with a big head in big corn, can fill its bin in just 5-6 mnutes, even if it held 500 bushels!
Still, this is where that third grain cart can really come in handy, as well as another semi or two.
 

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I don't think a dry or gas chemical can extinguish a smoldering fire unless it is 100% sealed off and all the oxygen is removed from the air. Of course that isn't possible on a combine, so a liquid works much better.

-Lance
 

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Hi

I think we will be seeing some major changes in the next 10 years with combines etc. I think the trend of large combines will reverse it's self in the next 10 years. The combines may end up being the size of say a 9400 etc, except have more capacity and can travel faster in the feilds. This can be done by removing the entire cab, and the operators platform, making the combine driverless, which saves on weight, and can move faster in the feilds since the operator is not on board. Someday a farm could be running a fleet of smaller driverless combines which can easily be transported, and move faster then todays machines. One of the engineering challenges will be to figure out how to harvest grain faster at higher speeds with a minamal amount of grain loss, that and designing a completely computer controled combine. I say by 2016-2018 or maybe as early as 2012 or 2014 we could be seeing something like this in the feilds. Right now Deere is working on driverless tractors( last I have read is that one is being tested in a California orchard) So I would not be surprised if they have a driverless combine being tested. A driverless combine will be a major revolution in harvesting technology and will be a milestone in Agricultural history Take Care Jason B
 

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Jason B your right that will proably be the way it will develope, but that means less people will be employed. So what do we do with them? Not being mean to you but the companies don't look at the long term of effect that it will take on the work force, plus all this technologey is a 4 letter thing to work on. Let it blow SMOKE then you know you have power to use. Don't mean to be against moving ahead but it takes time for a few of us.
 

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I know that it is probably inevitable that farming will be done with driverless tractors and combines but it is a day that I am not looking forward to. In my opinion it will take all of the fun out of farming.. One of my favorite places to be is in a tractor or combine.
 

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The driverless combine is a very long way off. If it were some mundane task that required nothing but navigation, it would be simple. It's the stuff like rocks in the feederhouse, a flat tire, a surge of crop matt coming in that you should slow down for, broken sections on the sickle bar, etc. That's the stuff that a computer will have a very hard time doing.

It takes artificial intelligence to do this stuff, and our current level of that cannot reason beyond simple logic. This is stuff the mind of a 5 year old child can do, but we can't get a computer even close to it.

-Lance
 

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Quote:Im sure that works like a charm (thumbs up)

R & D nightmare.

Corn might be the only crop out there that this would work with, since it is rare to have issues with the machine in corn. In wheat and soybeans, for example, there are too many issues with sickle sections breaking and trying to shave the ground nicely. Until I can see a wheat machine where the operator can get in in the morning, and get out at night, without fixing anything ever, then I'll just add the auto-steer navigation to it.

Whoever is developing this right now, I wish them the best of luck. It will be possible some day, but that day isn't coming for a very long time.

-Lance
 

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The main problem with driver-less combines is, in as much as a lot of people probably won't admit to. Most of us like driving combines, when its not going well we would probably still have to drive them. So why should it drive itself when the going is good!!!!! When you are in a big combine people watch you, you are king of the field!!!!
 

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Hi. New member here.

I'd just like to add that I believe the factories will continue to go the way of most profit for the stockholders and since they dont seem to much listen to the farmers, they'll likely continue to add bells and whistles rather than improve the designs.

I know what I'd like to se come from the factory is a choice of a stripped down, bare bones, no bells model and a loaded model for everyone else. I'd also like to see the factories work with some of the larger aftermarket companies to allow the machine to be setup for a specific crop better. I understand the reasoning behind building a "do it all ok, but do nothing great" machine since it has to be sold pretty much everywhere in every climate. But I'd like to set one up with bolt on parts and warranty for my area and my crop conditions. If anyone has experience with fresh sweet corn harvesting or fresh green beans, you'll know what I mean when you look at how well a corn picker works for the job it does. Or a bean picker for its job. It takes a bit more than just a header swap to make them work so well in their specific area of harvest.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Quote:Jason B your right that will proably be the way it will develope, but that means less people will be employed. So what do we do with them? Not being mean to you but the companies don't look at the long term of effect that it will take on the work force, plus all this technologey is a 4 letter thing to work on. Let it blow SMOKE then you know you have power to use. Don't mean to be against moving ahead but it takes time for a few of us.

Hi

I understand how you are feeling about this, I myself am a little errey of this technology in the future. I too love driving combines myself. The way I see it, this might or might not happen soon but eventually. Like the others said, a lot of work still needs to be done in order for this work. It may cause a smaller work force in the future but us humans are smart and will find some other jobs to keep us busy. Anyway you will probably have to manually drive the machine into the shed since the building blocks off the signals from the satilite to the GPS reciver. You will probably need a bunch of technicans to make sure these things get repaired when they brake down. I think the future will be an interesting one in deed. Take Care Jason B
 

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I must agree with Greedyguts and Caseihmech. I sure love the job of running the combine [at least whenever possible]. Yes, I can actually see where this driverless technology would be practical, but I also know that most likely someone would be onboard as a monitor to "babysit" the operation.

We can all rest assured, that NO self-operating, cybertronic, robot combine is going to replace a single one of us anytime within the next 20 years. Any true die-hard combine driver will still have full option of cxomplete manual override.


I am glad though, the technology of driverless machines is already here.
 

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Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, (UAVs) are pioneering the technology for pilotless transport aircraft, which I believe will happen someday. A ground bound vehicle like a combine has many more 'variables' than an air vehicle, but I also believe that with advancing technology, it will also happen with combines........no drivers.
 

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Hi

Here is another thought, picture this in say 2015.... One or two operators are controling an entire fleet of combines, let's say 3 combines per operator. This is also being tested out. I think the day where one or 2 operators control a fleet of combines makes more sence, although it will be more stressful on the operators since you will be responcible for 3 combines instead of one. Plus I can also see a few operators controling a fleet of trucks as well. In a sence, I see benifit's of A.I Technology,(ie: Driverless tractors, cars etc) although there are some parts of A.I technology that I wish we would stay clear of such as Robots that look like Humans,Cyborgs etc. Take Care Jason B
 
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