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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. More questions. Have a specialty rotor with gordon bars in front, small wire concaves with every other wire pulled because they have a more square edge than the large wire that were in there. Plan on using cover plate on front half of concave. Front two grates are keystock and back is slotted without the bars attached to it. Gordon airjet chaffer. I have either 4 or 8 straight bars in the middle of the rotor mainly for corn. Would I be ahead to take these out and put spiked rasp bars in for wheat harvest? My understanding is these straight bars only help in high yielding corn and hurt everything elso, efficiancy, power consumption etc...Expect 50+ bushel soft red winter wheat. What do you think, thanks in advance. P.S. Anyone use Gordon airjet wheat chaffer for k-31 fescue harvest? I am going to try it soon.
 

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Well I'm sure looking forward to hearing a report on the airjet in your area in fescue please. I'll be trying mine again this season. I hope I got things to where it wont spear so bad. I've tryed it for just a short bit each year the last 2 years. It would spear with long straws really bad, and not being in position to take the time to make guessing changes, I simply pulled the chaffer and went back to the standard. I made several changes to the machine this year again, and will try to get that chaffer to work.

I just bought a set of loewen helical concaves. I had been running the gorden helicals without wires. (thats the only way they come) The loewens have no center crossbar brace. This should really increase material flow through the concave. The helicals, especially with gorden bars, give a really true material retardation effect for a lot more threshing and seperating earlier in the transport. The older machines, and the standard belt drive rotor machines new, are not setup to run the helicals from the factory, which is why a lot of folks that try the helicals complain about them. Most say the helicals cause too much straw breakup etc. Some say they take more power. I hope to have solved that this year, we'll see.

We have not harvested wheat for 10 years. This year for rotational purposes, we have 250 acres of spring soft white. I plan to run some gorden bars and at least 2 cover plates out front. Or rather with the loewens, the whole first concave.:)
IMO, if you run the gorden bars, you may want to put the third keystock in. It'll depend on a lot of things like conditions, cut height, etc., but even though the gordens give a lot of extra threshing action, they also transport material a lot more efficiently, so............

I've ran the straight bars in grass and other small seeds, but removed them as I saw no benefit. I still have them on the shelf for a "tuning aid" should I need them someday. The gorden bars are a far better investment, IMO, than the straight bars.



 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Doorknob. I plan on using them in fescue for 100 acres maximum. Would they work okay for that amount of acreage. How was the tank sample for the amount you used them for. How is the sample in wheat with them? Thanks.
 

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The straight bars? Sure, they'll work fine as long as the material is dry. I sure would'nt remove them for small acreage, since you like them for other crops that you have more of.

The straight bars did'nt make any difference in the tank sample that i know of. I mainly installed them as I had a problem with the material stalling at the end of the concaves and entering the grates. We did'nt have that problem with the old standard rotor, so I figured I'd try the bars to simulate the old standard rotors seperator bars. It did'nt work.

The gorden bars on the other hand made a world of difference with material flow. As does the marlin impellers or Kile flights. Any upgraded inlet flighting is an improvement in material flow. I ran my own version of the marlins for several years. Now have the Kile setup and can get more material into the rotor which helps not allow the stall at the concave.
 

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interesting reading about your gorden rotor bars. Do you have to have them set right through the rotor to make them work most effeciently.? It seems from their web site that the gorden rotor bars in the seperation area are slightly bigger diameter to help with seperation.?
Looking at the Bison rotor it has a totally different set up for seperation , it would be interesting to compare the two in wheat.
 

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I'd sure like to have a Bison for trying in the grass.

The gorden bars are like any rasp bar as far as setup. On an 80 size machine, just make sure you install them in pairs at 180 on the rotor, (which I know is obvious but...) I preffer to install them in fours. I'm unaware of the larger diameter in the seperation unless something has changed since I bought mine. But they are a different size bar because of the different mounting setup on the rotor. The seperator bars are heavier and bigger.

I first ran a full set of gordens. All the way from the front to the back. It worked super in grass as long as it was dry. In the damper stuff it wanted to rope the material even worse than the stock bars. So I removed a few rows and installed spikes to tear the ropes apart, but still retain some of the greater seeration and material transport of the gordens. You can run them in whatever configuration you'd like. I've learned that maybe putting them in the very front of the rotor is'nt so great because they are a bigger bar and at the front of the rotor you're still dealing with the full amount of material coming in and it has not had a chance to be setup for threshing proper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey Doorknob, I meant the wheat chaffer. How was the tank sample. My soybean sample with the soy chaffer was very good. If it ever dries up, the wheat will be ready to run and I will find out myself. But, how was the wheat and fescue sample with the wheat airjet chaffer?
 

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Oh, whoops sorry.
For the short amount of time it was in the machine, the sample was great. It has fewer leaves and leaf pieces, just a few stems. I have the .250", the .281", and the .45" screens. I bought the .45" to see if it would help with the spearing last year. It did not. That is in tall fescue. I have not ran the airjet in wheat yet. Will do so this season, which is a little late this year. Should be about the first week in august.

Looking forward to your views of the performance. Since the air-jet is not adjustable. I'm thinking I may have to tape off the first section or maybe two of the screens. I was thinking if I taped off the screen part and left the air-jet open, it may help act as a sort of gleaner air seperator. That seems to be a problem with the conveyor auger machines is to get the material broke up enough before it drops onto the chaffer.
 
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