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Discussion Starter #1
the AFS Connect Axial Flow? Gotta figure it was probably on track for the 22' model year but with covid maybe pushed back a year?

It's cold and rainy here today so I'm bored.
 

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the tractors are the "afs connect" the combines are being reffered to as "afs harvest command" and will probably continue the same name even when they update it with the new 1200 monitor
 

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Discussion Starter #3
the tractors are the "afs connect" the combines are being reffered to as "afs harvest command" and will probably continue the same name even when they update it with the new 1200 monitor
Harvest command is the automation system, AFS Connect is the system that lets you remote view everything; two very different things. I was more getting at the inevitable cab redesign that will come with the upgrade.
 

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Harvest command is the automation system, AFS Connect is the system that lets you remote view everything; two very different things. I was more getting at the inevitable cab redesign that will come with the upgrade.
the 50 series hasnt been out long..... so the only thing the will do more than likely is upgrade the monitor so it will be compatible with the "connect" system aint much to change in the cab when everything goes thru the monitor

fyi i know what AFS Connect is i watch case ih closely
 

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I’m more so wondering if Case will change the guts of the machine soon. Been the same since 2003 AFX8010. Don’t see Case going twin rotor due to New Holland but a longer rotor and bigger sieves would be nice.
 

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I’m more so wondering if Case will change the guts of the machine soon. Been the same since 2003 AFX8010. Don’t see Case going twin rotor due to New Holland but a longer rotor and bigger sieves would be nice.

They tried all of that a few years ago, spent a bunch of money building a prototype machine, all for it to perform marginally better than current machines.
 

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They tried all of that a few years ago, spent a bunch of money building a prototype machine, all for it to perform marginally better than current machines.
This means that another solution was chosen because it did not improve so much?
 

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Then case will have to go twin rotor.
In a red Dress.
Just to stay in the game.
Or offer single or twin rotor
They will fall behind if they don’t come out with a machine to compete.
 

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Perhaps CNH will go the Agco route and build one super combine in the next couple years and offer it with colour/cab options of Case or New Holland.
They are already mostly the same machine besides rotors and driveline, so maybe Case CVT with New Holland twin rotor. Then they could redesign the sieves and grain handling system.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The question is just how big do you really want to go, I said it in a different thread, but 7000 bu/hr sounds great until you have to get it away from the field. At this point in 150 bu crops our 8120 takes a grain cart that never stops moving and 2 trucks with drivers to keep up on a 20 mile round trip haul, how much more do you really want with as hard as it is to find help. The custom harvesters that I have talked to want nothing to do with a machine that big, so it's a very limited market, do you really want to spend millions to develop a machine that you won't sell many of?
 

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The question is just how big do you really want to go, I said it in a different thread, but 7000 bu/hr sounds great until you have to get it away from the field. At this point in 150 bu crops our 8120 takes a grain cart that never stops moving and 2 trucks with drivers to keep up on a 20 mile round trip haul, how much more do you really want with as hard as it is to find help. The custom harvesters that I have talked to want nothing to do with a machine that big, so it's a very limited market, do you really want to spend millions to develop a machine that you won't sell many of?
The real market for big combines are mid to larger size farms that will benefit from dropping 3 machines to 2 or 6 to 3.
 

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The other consideration with bigger is weight, the current machines are already heavy enough.
 

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This means that another solution was chosen because it did not improve so much?
Their answer to it was their automation that I spent a few years testing. MY19 machines had something like a 2 sq in increase in sieve size so they called it “higher capacity” and had some data backing up that automation will outperform some operators in certain crops. Don’t get me wrong, I think their automation has potential, but I don’t think it was ready to be released.

Then case will have to go twin rotor.
In a red Dress.
Just to stay in the game.
Or offer single or twin rotor
They will fall behind if they don’t come out with a machine to compete.

You’ll never see a red twin rotor machine, the marketing department won’t let it happen. Though they’re the same company, NH and CIH compete with each other in the market and the Case marketing department has been very resistant to stray away from what makes the brand. There is one twin rotor red machine rolling around Europe that had VERY good performance in corn and wheat.
 

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Their answer to it was their automation that I spent a few years testing. MY19 machines had something like a 2 sq in increase in sieve size so they called it “higher capacity” and had some data backing up that automation will outperform some operators in certain crops. Don’t get me wrong, I think their automation has potential, but I don’t think it was ready to be released.




You’ll never see a red twin rotor machine, the marketing department won’t let it happen. Though they’re the same company, NH and CIH compete with each other in the market and the Case marketing department has been very resistant to stray away from what makes the brand. There is one twin rotor red machine rolling around Europe that had VERY good performance in corn and wheat.
So they think they can improve their performance preserving the single rotor design with a little bit bigger dimensions, and combining this with an automation system.

I don't understand why they are testing (with good performances too) a twin rotor machine in Europe if they want to stay detached from NH, could this be the new disguised CR?
 

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Ncf7.3 Do you work for the companies or something? Just the way you talk or type. I think you know more than the avg
I just have to say that the automation is worth all the money.
Even tho it’s a lot of money!
I’ll take canola for instance. The automation is all ways adjusting to the conditions and the sample is Awesome.
We have two units going we Tried one with it on and the other off. Weighed on the scale and automation was yielding us 0.9-1.4 bushel more every time. Who ever was putting in the values to program the automation was not sleeping that day!
I wish it had automation for every crop.
 

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The question is just how big do you really want to go, I said it in a different thread, but 7000 bu/hr sounds great until you have to get it away from the field. At this point in 150 bu crops our 8120 takes a grain cart that never stops moving and 2 trucks with drivers to keep up on a 20 mile round trip haul, how much more do you really want with as hard as it is to find help. The custom harvesters that I have talked to want nothing to do with a machine that big, so it's a very limited market, do you really want to spend millions to develop a machine that you won't sell many of?
Your not wrong. A bigger combine means at some point your going to have to increase everything down the line. As crop genetics get better and yields increase a combine with more capacity can take up any cushion you may have in your system. We found that before we added a grain cart we were having problems keeping the combine moving on the longer hauls. If there wasn't traffic, no bin changes and things were running perfectly smooth, the truck could keep up. But if you had anything slow you down, the combine was waiting. Now with more yield, more traffic, (sometimes the truck waits a minute to cross a highway) and so on we are to a point where the time cushion is almost used up, so changes are needed elsewhere. The guys around here that have multiple units, 4 to 6 machines, are the guys that I assume are the main target of the class 10 and up machines. If they could have one less machine, and maintain capacity, they just might go that way.

At some point I think there might be a bit of pecker waving between these companies to say who has the biggest and best machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Your not wrong. A bigger combine means at some point your going to have to increase everything down the line. As crop genetics get better and yields increase a combine with more capacity can take up any cushion you may have in your system. We found that before we added a grain cart we were having problems keeping the combine moving on the longer hauls. If there wasn't traffic, no bin changes and things were running perfectly smooth, the truck could keep up. But if you had anything slow you down, the combine was waiting. Now with more yield, more traffic, (sometimes the truck waits a minute to cross a highway) and so on we are to a point where the time cushion is almost used up, so changes are needed elsewhere. The guys around here that have multiple units, 4 to 6 machines, are the guys that I assume are the main target of the class 10 and up machines. If they could have one less machine, and maintain capacity, they just might go that way.

At some point I think there might be a bit of pecker waving between these companies to say who has the biggest and best machine.
I could see that in your country, around me there is no need for a machine that big, most farmers run 2 combines and we are usually limited by header size, anything over 35' isn't really feasible in this area. I can't imagine how fast you would have to run to feed a class 10 with 35'.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Their answer to it was their automation that I spent a few years testing. MY19 machines had something like a 2 sq in increase in sieve size so they called it “higher capacity” and had some data backing up that automation will outperform some operators in certain crops. Don’t get me wrong, I think their automation has potential, but I don’t think it was ready to be released.




You’ll never see a red twin rotor machine, the marketing department won’t let it happen. Though they’re the same company, NH and CIH compete with each other in the market and the Case marketing department has been very resistant to stray away from what makes the brand. There is one twin rotor red machine rolling around Europe that had VERY good performance in corn and wheat.
I've wondered about changing the angle of the rotor and making it a little steeper. I know it presents a problem with crop flow but would think you could remedy that with different bars. However my 1st grade understanding of physics suggests that if you would make it steeper you would theoretically let gravity work more for you in separation.
 

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I could see that in your country, around me there is no need for a machine that big, most farmers run 2 combines and we are usually limited by header size, anything over 35' isn't really feasible in this area. I can't imagine how fast you would have to run to feed a class 10 with 35'.
True we do grow a lot of straw and it can be green and tough when we go combining. There are neighbors with the 590, 770 and 780 Claas machines with 35 foot heads, and thats all they can handle.
 
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