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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys I have some problems with grain damage.We only plant corn and harvest it between 12-18% moisture.The problem is that below 14% we start getting bigger percentage of grain damage.Everything have been tried by our dealer but still it remains.We run a 9660 sts and a 9650 cts and although the damage is less on the sts it is still around 3%.I have heard that an axial-flow has almost no damage it is hard to believe.So I'm asking you all in your vast experience from driving all colour machines which one has the less damage?
 

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We run an 05 2388 and an 05 575 lex.
In low moisture corn both are good. Seems like the corn hybred makes more of a difference than anything (in my opinion).
I will say that the lexion overall has a better sample, but that could very well be from the operator.
In cab settings might also be the issue. Lex has em, 88 does not. Lex takes time to get to the "sweet spot", but is way easier to do by a touch of a button than stopping and walking around the machine to set sieves. Its one of the few "new technologies" (although lex. has had it for 10 years), that I think should be standard on every combine made.
Sorry cant help ya with green machines.
 

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If you are talking kernel damage, the axial flow probably has the lowest of any combine.

Tell us about farming in South Africa.

Are you harvesting yet?
 

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I agree with the last guy

Case's are easier to set up and will give you a better grain sample

even some cat guys i know say that


shhhhhhhhh lol
 

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Well i was being factual and honest......

ive seen many wagons at demonstrations where they took samples out of combines and showed which is better

Case,Deere,Cat,massey,Gleaner

thats just the common order on several wagons......

i will say nobody in my area has a massey and gleaner (thats even remotely new) so i can't speak of them

but we do have some guys who have ran all 3 and thats where i based my opinion.

Just to back it up
 

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Hopefully this can clear the mud.

Here the question:
"So I'm asking you all in your vast experience from driving all colour machines which one has the less damage?"

Here is my experience:

learned on a 1460 then 1480 then 1660 then 1680 then went through 3 different 9600's (green), then 2188, then 2388, then 470 lex, and now 575 lex and 2388.

Corn and beans 3-5000 acres per year.

All in all...........If the operator knows what he/she is doing, and aside from different capacities, comforts, and tech, they should all do the job in similar conditions.


Personally, Ive noticed corn varieties, weather patterns, nutrient deficiencies, and chemicals (Have not used a Dicamba product since 1998), play a big role in grain quality. Unfortunately some of these variables we cannot control.


The only true test would be to have a red guy show up and run em side by side. Then you will know if red has the abillity to do more gentle job in your feild with your weather pattern, your nutrients and your chemical applications.
Clear as mud eh?

 

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Quote:lol.....sure you don't want to try any other combines out there b757 lol

i think you missed a few




If it aint broke, dont fix it! We are happy with the situation right now.

Find me a combine with claas tracks, claas quality/durability, single rotor with 8010 capacity and for sure the cab, RWA, 5 bu/sec unload, Redekop chopper, PTO header drive, a CVT that does not fall apart...............And Paul Sanders with his service truck (our mech) on call............
It could be pink for all I care, that would be the pick of the litter.
In my not so humble opinion........
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
midwest,we are about 2 months away from harvest but it is still raining here like you won't believe.In the last 3 months we already had 3/4 of our annual rainfall.This harvest sure is going to be interesting.cropcutter, funny thing this cts story,dealers here were convinced it's the best thing since toilet paper so we tried the first ones ie:CTSII,ran for 6 seasons no problems.Year 2000,saw introduction of 9650cts,nice cab with some electronic goodies,is now 6 years old with few glitches.Year 2004,first single rotor on farm ie:9660sts with mapping and all the newer goodies.Had 9 breakdowns in 2 months,went ballistic and tried to punch the dealer but as usual his never in his office.Got to drive a new 2388 Extreme and lexion 470 last year.Lexion cab was very nice and quiet and handled 8-36 header easy but with 5% kernel damage and a new price of $30000 above other combines a bit pricey.2388 had outdated cab but otherwise had no negative points except the daily grease points was way more than my JD.So I'm waiting for the 8010 which will probably only arrive here in 2007 and I've heard with a pricetag of around $350-400000 without header,who knows maybe I should just import one for half the price haha.
 

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Thats the first time ive heard cat had a quiet cab and the 2388's was outdated (anything negative)

I bet you really liked the Deere's cab lol

yeah prices are pretty outrageous.....

Hope your not looking into the sprayer market!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

talk about crazy

you can roll 2 combines cheaper than lease a new sprayer
 

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Good to hear back from you.

What country is your farm equipment manufactured in?

When you say you grow only corn is that yellow corn like what most of us grown in the USA or is it white corn for the food industry?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
midwest,our equipment is manufactured in the USA.I think in the past they were slightly modified for our dry and dusty conditions but the last i've heard from the deere guys is that their equipment is straight imports no mods.We grow both white and yellow corn on a 50/50 basis and your correct that the yellow is used mainly for feeds and exports and the white is used locally to feed the nation.We eat the white corn milled into a powder like baking powder and is called "pap".Should try it sometime it's quite good!
 

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louisrbotha, why do you have to harvest the corn so dry?
Everywhere I have harvested farmers try to get the corn out of the field at 18% or even higher if the elevator takes it. The drier the corn gets the higher are the harvesting losses. You not only have more kernel damage, but also more and more buttshelling in the header.

If you get to try a Lexion, watch for the concave that it has. Claas makes quite a few different versions and it takes a wire concave for corn.
A new combine will always show more kernel damage in dry corn because its threshing elements/rasp bars and concaves still have sharp edges, that need to be worn off.
 

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Im with you Ralf,

Last fall we harvested with 575 and 2388 in 14-17% corn (highly unusuall for here, but very welcome), put most of it in storage. 80% of the corn was done with the 575.

Past two weeks we have delivered 150,000 bu to the elevator and ethanol plant with average of 1 FM and no damage.
This is all #2 yellow corn............Im guessing white is a whole different situation of which I can offer no assistance


Good Luck Louisbrotha!
 

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A few years ago I was growing seed beans and the company had a gentleman come in and explain how to set up our combine (CIH 2188) to get the highest quality of seed out of it. After he talked we got together and asked him what other crops he harvested........one of them was white corn for corn chip products. He stated that the chip company did not want a mark on the kernel. To do this they would basically tear down a new combine and grind all edges off inside. They also would go to the local dealer and get used rasp bars that had been changed out and put them on the new rotor. I think they would only run standard rotors.............one thing I will say about the old standard rotor is that it sure made it interesting combining soybeans. As far as harvest mosture, I don't remember talking about that.
 

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louisrbotha, what were your settings on your STS? In dry corn (18% is REALLY dry here) we were running the large bar concaves, 240 rpm on cylinder, 35-40 concave spacing, feeder house chain in low speed setting, and the feed accelerator in low speed. Our combine is equipped with the low speed kit for the feed accelerator (320 rpm instead of 440 rpm), which might help this problem. You should also be using smooth paddles, instead of serrated ones, on the accelerator.

In our situation we were actually able to get rid of the grain cleaner that cleaned the corn of fines etc when we got the Deere combine. The cleaner was set-up to clean the corn after it was dried. The combine used previous to the STS was a 2388, but it was not our own and was a custom operators. I have NO doubt that the reduction in fines is a result of operator and settings, not the machine.

How do these settings compare to yours?

Are you any relation to a "White buffalo"??
 

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Quote:A few years ago I was growing seed beans and the company had a gentleman come in and explain how to set up our combine (CIH 2188) to get the highest quality of seed out of it. After he talked we got together and asked him what other crops he harvested........one of them was white corn for corn chip products. He stated that the chip company did not want a mark on the kernel. To do this they would basically tear down a new combine and grind all edges off inside. They also would go to the local dealer and get used rasp bars that had been changed out and put them on the new rotor. I think they would only run standard rotors.............one thing I will say about the old standard rotor is that it sure made it interesting combining soybeans. As far as harvest mosture, I don't remember talking about that.

These are some very good points. I know guys who would put new smooth paddles on the feed accelerator to use in edible beans, but would run them first in their wheat crop to smooth them.
It definitely would be beneficial to run another crop through the machine to remove any sharp edges and burrs. This is a common practice in the edible bean industry. Never replace any parts that touch the grain just before you do any food grade crops. This includes augers, rotor parts, concaves etc.
 
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