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Having run cross augers this past year on FD75's and seeing the benefit in straight cutting canola I am wanting now to put one on the swather. I am growing L140P and cutting it fairly ripe and it would not flow through the opening unless it had a dew on it or was outright raining.

So I have narrowed it down to a kit between either M&R Machines in Weyburn, SK or Ag-Shield in Benito, MB. Both would likely do the job but the sales pitch was pretty convincing for the Ag-Shield cross auger. It does carry an almost $2000 premium to the price but if it is as good as they claim it would have a payback for sure.

So has anybody run either of these cross auger kits on a swather in RIPE canola and can share on this? If you have experience with both then I really want to hear what you think! TIA:smile:

I have no website for the M&R guys but here is a video of the Ag-Shield setup.
 

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I have no first hand experience running a cross auger on a swather..... But..... I did buy a "used" one this year for one of my combine headers. The auger I bought was used on a swather in canola for less than an hour, they were hoping it would help feed the canola to the middle on a 40' header. After the first hour it was taken off as the canola just wanted to wrap on the auger. Good for me I guess!
 

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I know nothing of the M&R but my harvesters liked the ag shield because it went further out to the ends, they have 4 ag shields and 2 Macdons on thier FD75's

Should also say that crop deviders like they have on in that video make a huge difference also so if ya don't have them it may be something to consider while your spending money
 

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I've got a cross auger on my 40ft MacDon swather, you have to pull off the centre paddles but otherwise it works very well. You can adjust the speed from the cab and running it too fast would make it wrap.
 

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Dont waste your time on the cross auger. Does nothing for ripe canola. Works ok in heavier canola with more pliable stems.

Why not just straight cut it if you are swathing it that ripe any way? Testing showed minimal losses if left standing ripe for a month.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've got a cross auger on my 40ft MacDon swather, you have to pull off the centre paddles but otherwise it works very well. You can adjust the speed from the cab and running it too fast would make it wrap.
Then it would match the stupid split reel that MacDon has which wrapped about a thousand times with canola last year!:mad:

Dont waste your time on the cross auger. Does nothing for ripe canola. Works ok in heavier canola with more pliable stems.

Why not just straight cut it if you are swathing it that ripe any way? Testing showed minimal losses if left standing ripe for a month.
Which one did you use?

Reason I want to swath is that the stuff I swathed ripe yielded the same as the stuff that I straight cut and we were going 2mph faster with the combines. Also the straw and chaff was chopped way better and spread more evenly after the swather. I am assuming way less fuel burnt too. Plus, it keeps my combine guys happier.:wink:
 

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Then it would match the stupid split reel that MacDon has which wrapped about a thousand times with canola last year!:mad:

Reason I want to swath is that the stuff I swathed ripe yielded the same as the stuff that I straight cut and we were going 2mph faster with the combines. Also the straw and chaff was chopped way better and spread more evenly after the swather. I am assuming way less fuel burnt too. Plus, it keeps my combine guys happier.:wink:
I NEVER had my reel wrap in the center last year but the upper cross and feed auger would be keeping it away from the arm I guess.

Surprised your 9090's do any different job regardless straw conditions, which chopper?

Way less fuel? Well, my swather runs neither for free nor without fuel, if your's do you should definitely swath.
 

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I had some canola pile up in the middle but rarely that it ever affected feeding, thats just the way it was until I pulled it off at the end of my shift. Once you wrap it a few times you learn how to run your reel higher which usually makes a better swath anyways.

I swathed some really ripe canola in the rain and even with the cross auger it was really bunchy. The Ag shield cross auger looks better than the Macdon version because of the stripper bar, MD needs that badly.
 

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Swathing ripe canola, cost of the machine, diesel, operator, time you could be combining, header loss, going slower then a combine - doesn't seem to financially outweigh straight cutting it faster with no loss - at the cost of residue spreading. Since its ripe anyways!

Why do you wait till its too ripe? Is this common yearly practice?
 

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He also stated he was running combines 2mph faster in swathed. Those combine hours aren't free either. Straw and chaff management is hard to put a value on but easier seeding in the spring and more even germanation are big concerns for us as well. And the biggest advantage. Keeping the combine operators HAPPY!! That's priceless.
 

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He also stated he was running combines 2mph faster in swathed. Those combine hours aren't free either. Straw and chaff management is hard to put a value on but easier seeding in the spring and more even germanation are big concerns for us as well. And the biggest advantage. Keeping the combine operators HAPPY!! That's priceless.
Faster often just means forking more canola on the ground however due to the ease of putting brittle straw through.

Puzzled by any complaint about any condition straw through a 9090 being a issue, never saw that on the units I ran with.

I used to like swathing but the no plugging, smooth feeding, zero loss, zero chance of swaths blowing around while watching the scenery from seat of my automatic everything Claas, not interested anymore.:)
 

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Faster often just means forking more canola on the ground however due to the ease of putting brittle straw through.

Puzzled by any complaint about any condition straw through a 9090 being a issue, never saw that on the units I ran with.

I used to like swathing but the no plugging, smooth feeding, zero loss, zero chance of swaths blowing around while watching the scenery from seat of my automatic everything Claas, not interested anymore.:)

Much more relaxing picking a swath late at night....there were some guys trying to straight cut canola this year around our way. If you have your **** together and are organized you can do ok. But some guys weren't and left it to long and when I was looking at their standing canola fields I bet they lost over 60% due to the wind shattering it. The swaths in the same area had no damage.

We like to do our wheat first and get it off before it rains so we can a #1 for it. If we had to pull out of wheat to do our standing then we would probably land up losing a grade on our wheat.
 

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Cant comment on Ag Shield (that was our 2nd choice) as we put a Honey Bee on our HB combine header and do peas and yellow mustard with it. The cross auger is mounted with two implement jacks that pivot so you can adjust the height of the auger in relation to the drapers as well as further or closer to the back wall of header. For mustard you are not too picky but for peas we do adjust position of auger for dry and bushy or damp and flattened. And being able to remove and install center paddles are important too, again mainly for peas but somewhat of benefit for mustard too. Depends on how many crop varieties you plan to use the cross auger with, it does help a bit in barley when weedy.
 

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Much more relaxing picking a swath late at night....there were some guys trying to straight cut canola this year around our way. If you have your **** together and are organized you can do ok. But some guys weren't and left it to long and when I was looking at their standing canola fields I bet they lost over 60% due to the wind shattering it. The swaths in the same area had no damage.

We like to do our wheat first and get it off before it rains so we can a #1 for it. If we had to pull out of wheat to do our standing then we would probably land up losing a grade on our wheat.
Since this is sort of a straight cut/swath thread anyway...

Got to admit, read your post, what wtf is he talking about?!
Then...noticed location.
If you straight cut canola in our area wheat will long, long be off the field before you can think of doing standing canola.
No conflict, in fact more likely to have a labor conflict if you swath you may be doing wheat at the same time.

I'm beginning to consider these anecdotal canola shattering stories old wives tails, not because it maybe didn't happen to you but because it's never happened to me and I've chased too ******* many swaths to not make it crystal clear to me which is better.

Picking up swaths at night more relaxing? Say what?!:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Been a busy day, good discussion here! I will clarify some things.

I NEVER had my reel wrap in the center last year but the upper cross and feed auger would be keeping it away from the arm I guess.

Surprised your 9090's do any different job regardless straw conditions, which chopper?

Way less fuel? Well, my swather runs neither for free nor without fuel, if your's do you should definitely swath.
I tried every setting on that reel to keep it from wrapping. Usually hapened when part of header was lodged and rest(especially middle) was standing.

You are in a different climate than me I am pretty sure. The 9090's put it through pretty well but green canola stalks go through hard!

Whatever fuel the swathers burn it would be a pittance compared to a 550HP combine. The time spent swathing bothers me more and that is what I am attempting to rectify with a cross-auger.

Swathing ripe canola, cost of the machine, diesel, operator, time you could be combining, header loss, going slower then a combine - doesn't seem to financially outweigh straight cutting it faster with no loss - at the cost of residue spreading. Since its ripe anyways!

Why do you wait till its too ripe? Is this common yearly practice?
OK when we are swathing here the grain is ripe but the straw is not, we are swathing to cure the straw. When straight cutting the low spots were coming out like silage whereas the stuff that had been swathed for only a few days was coming out like dust. Same moisture in both methods, about 9.5%.

Going from 3.5mph straight cutting to 5.5mph on the swath basically saves a third of the combine hours and probably a greater percentage of fuel as the combines were running closer to power limit while straight cutting. That is a huge savings and well worth any time spent on the swather IMO.

Faster often just means forking more canola on the ground however due to the ease of putting brittle straw through.
I can't say that losses were any higher with either method but we never let the canola get lower than 9% moisture and straw was generally not over-dry because it hadn't been swathed for long.

But some guys weren't and left it to long and when I was looking at their standing canola fields I bet they lost over 60% due to the wind shattering it. The swaths in the same area had no damage.
I grow all L140P and wind losses are really not an issue with that variety. Right before we harvested ours field straight there was a very windy day(like 80 km/hr+) and there was no visible losses. Swaths were roughed up on the ends where roller didn't get them squarely and over a few hills but not very much at all. Even the blown stuff didn't shatter at all, just had to make a few extra passes at the end to pick up the flipped swaths.

Picking up swaths at night more relaxing? Say what?!:eek:
Don, every mfr but Claas has had a really nice auto header height on their pick-up heads for ages now, makes picking a swath very easy. I would note that Claas does now finally have this available. I would not buy a combine without it!
 

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Don, every mfr but Claas has had a really nice auto header height on their pick-up heads for ages now, makes picking a swath very easy. I would note that Claas does now finally have this available. I would not buy a combine without it!
Correct, until 2015 when Claas and MacDon finally do have both sides observed and averaged auto header height on pickups.

But more important, I was in fields with a mix of swather widths this fall, the endless track settings and tendency for angles to be slightly different combined with that POS display I have means it's far easier to just straight cut your own paths.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Nobody on here run either of the two brands I mentioned earlier that wants to share???
 
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