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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for a header for our 9870. I've been running our ancient 936D that we've had for several combines since the early 2000's and it's absolutely shot. Looking at 635D's. Would go to 40 but due to our spread out situation and narrow roads I'd be taking it off all the time to move. Neighbor says I should go with MacDon Flex or a Deere flex but the deere's are junk. Seems to be a lot of them around though. Cutting wheat only with it. Thoughts?
 

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Buddy of mine has a couple 9870s. They just bought a couple 40ft grainbelt honeybees for them. They are happy with them and use them for wheat and canola.
 

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I don't see how a Deere flex would be a good fit for you. Unless you are going to include any pulses in your farm. I prefer to not cut cereals with the 635F but you can. Definitely reduces capacity of your combine in that situation. Maybe that is why you called them junk. They really aren't. Cruising around in a lentil field at 5 mph definitely brings a smile to your face. We changed all the bearings on our 936D headers for this fall and rebuilt the canvas tightner systems where they had worn big slots where holes are supposed to be. Re-cut new key slots on the shaft that drives the reel. Bought one new canvas from A&I that seems to be working fine, for just under 1/2 price of the Deere canvas. My point is unless you have structural damage that has weakened that header, I think you can get more out of it yet. Can't comment on the MacDon flex's, but I know I hate having to transport our D-60 swather header. Would drive an hour out of the way rather that take it off, and I hear locking up a flex into transport is worse.

John
 

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If all you're going to cut is wheat then a flexing draper of any kind is a waste of money.

The slow speed transport option on MacDon headers is pretty slick. It is a bit heavy for me to move the wheels (we lower the headers to make it easier on the back), but only takes about 5 minutes to switch back and forth. Unhooking it from the combine is way easier than unhooking it from the swather. There's no difference between flexing and rigid. But I agree if you needed to move the header every day, probably dropping it on a trailer would be faster and easier.
 

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We have 2 Deere 635FD headers. We use them mostly on Wheat. Usually lodged. Can't say a bad thing about them. If you have lateral tilt on the feeder house, there is no operator interventions required there are no capacity issues using them. In 2 years no issues whatsoever. Your dealership should update the software on the Combine and header to minimize issues.

We use the hockey stick headsight control from Deere. Set and forget . The unit does not have to be locked up prior to transport. Just lock up the hockey sticks and set on the trailer. We use Horst Welding trailers with the rear steering. To put on / off transport it is less than 2 mins.

Our units are MY2017.
 

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Have run Deere flex drapers for 5 years and 640D regular drapers before that. With just wheat there is no point in getting a flexdraper. The 600D’s are very reliable, but the height sensing system sucks. Deere updated it about 3 times and it only worked marginally better. The headsight system is the only way to go if you have challenging fields. Probably 5-6k if you install yourself. MacDons are fine as well
 

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We have 2 Deere 635FD headers. We use them mostly on Wheat. Usually lodged. Can't say a bad thing about them. If you have lateral tilt on the feeder house, there is no operator interventions required there are no capacity issues using them. In 2 years no issues whatsoever. Your dealership should update the software on the Combine and header to minimize issues.

We use the hockey stick headsight control from Deere. Set and forget . The unit does not have to be locked up prior to transport. Just lock up the hockey sticks and set on the trailer. We use Horst Welding trailers with the rear steering. To put on / off transport it is less than 2 mins.

Our units are MY2017.
The first few years are great, but they don’t hold up to an abusive operator as well as the other options. I agree about the awesomeness of the Horst trailers
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Stripper header!

Wait, I thought you were running a stripper header?
I still have it. We do quite a bit of custom cutting now and customers don't want the stripper straw. Also, we grow some higher yielding (for us anyway, Palouse boys would be bankrupt with our yields) varieties that can be really short and we miss a lot with the stripper header. So if it's tall enough we use it, but if not I don't hesitate to straight cut it. They are great headers. But I've told a few interested guys that depending on conditions they are not a silver bullet.
 

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Macdon all the way, get a FD70 or newer, some nice updates on the FD75/FD100 series. Don't bother with the slow speed transport, I just use a header trailer and its way more convenient and faster. I cut a lot of different crops (wheat, durum, canola, soybeans, flax, peas), even straight cut some oats and it worked pretty good with that. I custom cut with a few different operators and they comment on how good of job it does. The constant reel to cutter bar design is huge, feeds a lot better that Deere, hands down in tough conditions. Its floating adapter is really easy to run, nice when you can put anyone in a combine and they don't have to worry about the fine details. I'm going to be getting another one soon
 

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I have 2 FD70s this year I put the contour buddy wheels on them now we cut in flex mode and man is it nice cutting no more running the header by hand.
 

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2012/13 JD FD's were known for not feeding that great. I have a 13' and 14' with cross augers, and for the most part feed pretty good. 14 improved the centre drum (slip clutch and added some fingers).
Deeres been making improvements all along with a big swing in 2016. Completely different centre drum and improved dividers and Macdon style reel fingers. Deere made another big swing in 19 with the 700 series drapers. Flippable canvas and larger longer cross auger as the big ones.

I see pros and cons to both.

The JD is a pretty tough header. Canvas' unreal expensive from Deere (go aftermarket). Has a good knife for the most part but some issue with build up at double knife drive overlap. Lentils, peas, chickpeas can be short and as long as they aren't pasted to the ground header will follow really well and likely leave less than the Macdon.
Also unless you have Jd combines with fore and aft tilt feeder house, changing angle is a pita. For us changing the angle with the Deeres seemed to be quite a difference in different conditions.

I can see the advantage of the reel to knife distance unchanging with the Macdon as I've cut several thousand of acres of pulses with a HB grainbelt header in the past. Also the responsiveness of the Macdon with the contour buddy wheels. Again advantage to Macdon on a pre 2015 combine or newer Jd's without for and aft FH tilt.

None of my friends rave about canola feeding with a MD and most run them. They all complain about the centre drum. Basically longevity wise they think the MD is a piece of ****. Been quite a few written off around here, and it's pretty flat country. If the crop is pasted to the ground Md probably has the advantage.

As far as this fall with snow flattened crops the old 635f worked as good as anything.
 
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