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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Son in law showed the a picture of a Gleaner that has tipped over frontwards doing the internet rounds.
Must be in the PNW. Not one of yours Glenn?
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Were u in my postcode and didn’t ring me for brunch
 
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Ooohhh Deere
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So share the pics Srod
 

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Back over 40 years ago I spun a MH out going up hill. As kid I heard stories that the JD 95H's would some times back up what they could not do going forward. So tried it with the MH. Spun it around backing up, never put the header down. All at once slammed forward on the header. In the second or 2 it took, I thought I was going end over end. Settled down on the header and starts moving up the bank. No damage other than spilling a bit of barley out of the full grain tank.

Used a longer less steep way to get the what had been 30 yards to the truck to dump. Never made down hill corner with the header more than a foot off the ground. And yes some of the crazy steep little patches I cut over the next 35 years I did have the back wheels off the ground. But never slammed down with force like first time. Because if I thought it would stand on its nose the header was 2 to 4 inches from the ground.
 

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I don't know of any that went over forwards. Had a mechanical failure of one in the area a year ago that went backwards down a hill into a canyon and piled up laying on its side. Driver set brake and jumped out. Followed it down the hill and put out a fire that started from the parking brake.

I stood an R52 on its nose in 1992 due to no rear tire ballast and it stayed there for an hour before we could get a cable on it to pull the rear end down. It just kept pushing the header up and rear was about 6 feet off the ground and hydro in reverse to hold it there as the edge of the header on one side was out of the field looking into the canyon. I'll attach a picture of the field edge with a combine cutting the outde round and we make sure the rear tires are loaded with ballast.
Sky Plant Vehicle Slope Bedrock


The most unstable now is the S98 with the longer feederhouse. I stood ours up a couple years ago in the dark cutting chickpeas. On a steep hill and turned downhill and didn't turn off the RWA and it got to hopping. Turned off the RWA and that speeds up the combine just like any time you turn off the RWA other than trying to hold the combine back. Pull back the hydro that runs by wire and it stops versus the older ones that you have to pull into reverse to get it stopped going down the hill. That let the rear end lift pushing up the header. I was a little over half full of beans but they ran to the front and over the top and down the cab spilling over the front to the ground. That turns on the rotating beacons in the dark getting my nephew's attention in the tractor with the cart. That threw me out of the seat and I'm on the foot rests pushing back into the back of the seat trying to stay in the cab. I pushed on the hydro and stepped on the brake to turn it to get the rear end down. It wouldn't move even at full hydro. Rotating lights standing on the nose with beans continuously running over the front wondering why the combine won't move. Took me awhile running through my head but figured I had to get butt pressure back into the seat like I was sitting in it and pulled hydro back to neutral and then forward and then the combine moved and turned and settled back down and went back to cutting. Try that with the new ones. Don't sit in the seat and push forward on the hydro and you will see it won't go.

Thanks for the safety updates but I haven't found it in the trouble shooting section what to do when standing on your nose and can't sit in the seat and the combine won't go.

Accidents do happen but all I know of is the one that went down the hill backwards also a couple of miles up this road from this attached picture.

Sky Plant Plant community Ecoregion Infrastructure
 

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Is it just a few parts of some fields that have these steep sections or is most of the farm steep like the photos? Definitely scenic, but wow it must be expensive to farm and extremely limited on the crop choices that can be grown.
 

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1 coupler to the planetary lets loose and your in for a ride lol. Even blow a tire loaded and your in for a ride sidehilling. I still remember as a kid my uncle who farmed at Leask by the Sask river had hills bad. Their TR70 had the back end slide down the slope and had to get pulled up to get out. Steep enough they didn't want to chance anything trying to drive it out.
 

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It varies throughout the county. Broad ridge tops and valley floors. The buildings in the upper left are 20 miles by road. The hills to the top right are the Skyrockets which are some of the twistiest, steepest, softest nasty hills in the country. Those are the ones everyone want to come and see. Our county is about 25 miles long and elevation is 600 feet to 6600 feet in the Blue Mountains. Rainfall in that same earth is 6 inches to 86 inches in the mountains so a lot of differing terrain. Within 40 miles west you hit the flat country and then the irrigated deserted where some if the most productive land in the country is located.

The picture was taken at 3000 feet and the tractor spraying the wheat on the hillside is at 2000 feet. The top left elevator buildings are at 1000 feet in elevation.

Sky Ecoregion Natural landscape Slope Mountain
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Certainly would be different to farm that sort of country. I think I would need to pack a spare pairs of undies to take to work everyday
Thanks for the beautiful pictures Glenn.
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Certainly would be different to farm that sort of country.
Thanks for the beautiful pictures Glenn.
so when are we going over to pay GlennW a visit Srod...........
 

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It varies throughout the county. Broad ridge tops and valley floors. The buildings in the upper left are 20 miles by road. The hills to the top right are the Skyrockets which are some of the twistiest, steepest, softest nasty hills in the country. Those are the ones everyone want to come and see. Our county is about 25 miles long and elevation is 600 feet to 6600 feet in the Blue Mountains. Rainfall in that same earth is 6 inches to 86 inches in the mountains so a lot of differing terrain. Within 40 miles west you hit the flat country and then the irrigated deserted where some if the most productive land in the country is located.

The picture was taken at 3000 feet and the tractor spraying the wheat on the hillside is at 2000 feet. The top left elevator buildings are at 1000 feet in elevation.

View attachment 163304
Glenn, those pics bring back some memories! Back about 30 years ago now, I spent a summer harvesting peas for D&K out of Walla Walla. I worked night shift so most of the time I couldn't see much, but I'll never forget staring down into a deep gully wondering whether or not I was going to stop sliding before I landed in it. Open operator's platform, no seat belt, and I was on the downhill side. The machine sat right there the rest of the night. I guess the field dried out enough the next day for them to drive it out, because the next night we were working a different field.
 

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Glenn, those pics bring back some memories! Back about 30 years ago now, I spent a summer harvesting peas for D&K out of Walla Walla. I worked night shift so most of the time I couldn't see much, but I'll never forget staring down into a deep gully wondering whether or not I was going to stop sliding before I landed in it. Open operator's platform, no seat belt, and I was on the downhill side. The machine sat right there the rest of the night. I guess the field dried out enough the next day for them to drive it out, because the next night we were working a different field.
Lots of people worked peas in the old days. It helped get a lot of us through college. We had the Green Giant that then sold to Smith Frozen Foods in NE Oregon. Green Giant had a labor camp and a lot of people came from Tennessee ands other areas in the SE every year.

You probably did the right thing and left the combine to dry out. Those pea vines are very slippery. Now it is history with a couple small processors doing fresh peas anytime.

I went by a pea field being harvested this summer. Crop was so poor they were swathing with a wider header so the stripper heads had something to pick up.

Green peas bring back memories. Thanks for sharing your story and if got ever come back out this way let me know.
Tire Wheel Sky Vehicle Harvester


Sky Plant Vehicle Harvester Tractor
 
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