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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So our tractor unit on our windrower is starting to get some bad oxidization/fading and was wondering if a good buffing compound would help. This is not our cutter but very similar paint issues. second image is what it used to look like
Tire Wheel Plant Land vehicle Vehicle
Wheel Tire Sky Vehicle Automotive tire
 

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I have many different polishes and compounds and what works on one will not on another so it's trial and error . A compound buffing will definitely work but it's allot of work with a certain amount of skill necessary . Just by looking the first thing I would try would be a restore wax called Nu finish .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have many different polishes and compounds and what works on one will not on another so it's trial and error . A compound buffing will definitely work but it's allot of work with a certain amount of skill necessary . Just by looking the first thing I would try would be a restore wax called Nu finish .
Ok i heard from a local detailer at john deere dealership to try rupes 2 step coarse and then fine buffing compound
 

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I have a Macdon M 150 that the engine hood looks like this and the cab hood looks like new. I would be curious to see what works. I have tried buffing it but have not had great success. I thought sometimes it would have to be repainted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a Macdon M 150 that the engine hood looks like this and the cab hood looks like new. I would be curious to see what works. I have tried buffing it but have not had great success. I thought sometimes it would have to be repainted.
Did you try a course and fine grit compound or just an all in 1. I messaged a guy that works at a Deere dealership in the detailing department and recommended rupes 2 step instead of one he uses called 3D. The 2 step is better for a lot more faded/ oxidized paint he said. We might just try some stuff we have on hand to see if we see any sort of difference. Will try it on some of the bad spots and if we see improvements we might get 2 course and 2 fine pads and a 250ml bottle of the fine and 250ml of the fine all for like 130 cad
 

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With paint restorers is the protective coat permanent or do you have to semi-regularly apply more protectant? I tried a paint restorer on a truck once and it I must not have put enough protectant on it because it was faded again within a month. Something has to protect the newly cut and exposed paint or it will oxidize again pretty quickly. If there's something that works and is long-lasting, I have an number of machines I'd love to shine up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
With paint restorers is the protective coat permanent or do you have to semi-regularly apply more protectant? I tried a paint restorer on a truck once and it I must not have put enough protectant on it because it was faded again within a month. Something has to protect the newly cut and exposed paint or it will oxidize again pretty quickly. If there's something that works and is long-lasting, I have an number of machines I'd love to shine up.
Thats a good question i might msg that guy on instagram to see what he does for that. Have you had good results then buffing oxidized paint?
 

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Not really. Buffing an oxidized paint lightly is just going to remove the protectant layer until you get to the paint itself, and then the buffing will remove the oxidization. And it will look quite nice. However you have to cover all that up with a clear coat of something to block UV and oxygen, or it will just fade again quickly. I'm skeptical of the simple processes I've seen advertised. Also any kind of buffing is going to thin the paint coat. Just something to be aware of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not really. Buffing an oxidized paint lightly is just going to remove the protectant layer until you get to the paint itself, and then the buffing will remove the oxidization. And it will look quite nice. However you have to cover all that up with a clear coat of something to block UV and oxygen, or it will just fade again quickly. I'm skeptical of the simple processes I've seen advertised. Also any kind of buffing is going to thin the paint coat. Just something to be aware of.
So you mean it works good once you get to the paint then. If theres a way to seal it again it would be worth it?
 

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If I knew these compounds cost that much $$ I think I would put that towards a new can of paint.
Those swathers must have got a different supplier of paint they fade something terrible and the colour shade seems off.
The late 800 series combines with polyurethane paint stood up better.
Probably all a person will get from parts now is the enamel paint?
 

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So you mean it works good once you get to the paint then. If theres a way to seal it again it would be worth it?
Not really in my mind. Maintaining the clear coat on a regular basis is required. I'm just not interested in detailing my machines even every year like that. Once you remove the clear coat and thin the paint, you must do the protectant every so often forever really. If painting wasn't so expensive, I'd sooner get a machine professionally repainted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes for sure. It's required. I'm just not interested in detailing my machines every year like that. Once you remove the clear coat and thin the paint, you must do it every so often forever really. If painting wasn't so expensive, I'd sooner get a machine professionally repainted.
Hmm true we do have an airbrush maybe we should repaint all the red spots on the machine then apply a sealant lol
 

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I just messaged him this is stuff he said he seals with after polishing https://www.tandtcleaner.com/tandt-protect/paint-pro
Looks interesting. I'm still skeptical. A professional body painter applies a clear coat with a spray applicator, and probably uses a lot more coating than you'd get from this. Rubbing a relatively tiny amount of waxy sealant on doesn't seem like it will last that long without re-applying.

That said, the worst that will happen is you'll end up with the same faded paint job again, although this time the paint is even thinner. Give it a try and see what happens.
 
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