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It must not have clearcoat then as otherwise the paint should look good, it would seem they are not using the latest in automotive grade coatings. I have done a JD hood for example by using a variable speed power polisher with a foam pad and used a fairly fine cutting compound followed by a polishing compound. But its easy to make the mistake of going too course and create scratches that are very hard to get buffed out. Also not switching to a new pad for the fine compound and having some of the courser compound still in a pad or on the surface that was not wiped off completely. I've seen people have to get their vehicle repainted from some idiot detailing shop that didn't know what they were doing and burn the paint by using the wrong buffing pads and more then likely running the polisher too fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Looks interesting. I'm still skeptical. A professional body painter applies a clear coat with a spray applicator, and probably uses a lot more coating than you'd get from this. Rubbing a relatively tiny amount of waxy sealant on doesn't seem like it will last that long without re-applying.
If you have instagram or twitter search deeredetailer does some good work. Maybe it would be worth talking to our local massey dealer and see how much it would cost to get it repainted and new decals put on. I honestly think the 2007-2011 massey windrowers had some very bad paint or something because all the newer stuff and even tractors and combines from the same year do not seem to have the same issues as the windrowers have in terms of paint
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
It must not have clearcoat then as otherwise the paint should look good, it would seem they are not using the latest in automotive grade coatings. I have done a JD hood for example by using a variable speed power polisher with a foam pad and used a fairly fine cutting compound followed by a polishing compound. But its easy to make the mistake of going too course and create scratches that are very hard to get buffed out. Also not switching to a new pad for the fine compound and having some of the courser compound still in a pad or on the surface that was not wiped off completely. I've seen people have to get their vehicle repainted from some idiot detailing shop that didn't know what they were doing and burn the paint by using the wrong buffing pads and more then likely running the polisher too fast.
How does one go to course isnt there standards the manufacturer follow? or by just using to much?
 

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I doubt there is an actual standard exactly as it depends on the paint and how much cutting is to be done and if clear coat or not etc. To a degree there would be information on what product should be used but the best information is from someone who knows there stuff as per experience and can point you in the right direction with the correct compounds, the right type of buffer and buffer wheels and what speed to run them at. For an example when I was mentioning burning paint, using a sheeps wool type pad and spin that too fast and not move along fast enough can do lots of damage fast as per seeing someone else make a mess on a spot of their own vehicle. Also sharp edges or bend lines in metal, being careful not to hit those edges with the pad spinning the wrong direction. Not meaning to scare you as the right foam pad and fine polish and not running the polisher very fast and would have to try very hard to ever cause damage ( cutting compound is the product that would be more touchy ). Using more compound then required makes a mess but not using enough is when the heat would build if ran fast with the wrong pad. Using too course a compound though is bad as I mentioned before as one wants to use as fine a compound as possible that will do the job and step down from there to the polishing compound. Think of it like using too course a sand paper, easily done but hard to correct the mistake once those deep scratches are into the surface. You don't want to take off anymore paint then you need to nor make scratches in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
I doubt there is an actual standard exactly as it depends on the paint and how much cutting is to be done and if clear coat or not etc. To a degree there would be information on what product should be used but the best information is from someone who knows there stuff as per experience and can point you in the right direction with the correct compounds, the right type of buffer and buffer wheels and what speed to run them at. For an example when I was mentioning burning paint, using a sheeps wool type pad and spin that too fast and not move along fast enough can do lots of damage fast as per seeing someone else make a mess on a spot of their own vehicle. Also sharp edges or bend lines in metal, being careful not to hit those edges with the pad spinning the wrong direction. Not meaning to scare you as the right foam pad and fine polish and not running the polisher very fast and would have to try very hard to ever cause damage ( cutting compound is the product that would be more touchy ).
Another thing to think is the paint underneath still good? That’s why we were gonna try some some stuff we had sitting around and get a pad for 10 bucks and see what a compound that we had sitting around and see what it would look like and if it’s worth getting some better stuff for heavier oxiddization. I should look se if I have a picture of our swather on my phone if not I should go grab a few just to show how bad the oxidization is
 

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You are right, at some point the paint is no good and its like trying to polish a turd, yes it might bring back some colour but nothing like it should. Has your swather sat outside since new vs been in a shed in the off season as that can sure age paint that isn't protected with clear coat. I would try a small area and see what it does but again try to avoid something that is too aggressive. I believe I was running my polisher in that 500 to 1000 rpm as an example.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
You are right, at some point the paint is no good and its like trying to polish a turd, yes it might bring back some colour but nothing like it should. Has your swather sat outside since new vs been in a shed in the off season as that can sure age paint that isn't protected with clear coat. I would try a small area and see what it does but again try to avoid something that is too aggressive. I believe I was running my polisher in that 500 to 1000 rpm as an example.
Yep sat outside since we bought it sadly as most of our equipment has too. But our 1 tractor sits outside all year the paint looks like new minus not being shiny and that’s John Deere green. We also have a tulip disc that’s never been in a shed since we or the dealer have had it and that was same era as our hay cutter and the paint looks mint. Its hard since we do cattle so have combines and forage stuff and all the bales shredders and such and run a alfalfa cubing plant. So we can only park a loader and tractor in the 1 heated building with the cuber, then we parked one telehandler and the feed mixer and tractor where we bag the cubes,and we get get one telehandler in our tiny shop that was built in the 80s. Other then that we have 3 conjoined building that is always filled with hay or cubes and 1 hay shed and 1 we call our bag storage where we store our packaged cubes. So most of our roofs our covering stuff that helps with cubing and cattle and we are so diverse equipment wise we would only get a third of our things inside what we currently have for building. We probably have 30 different implements alone plus our tractors and still have certain implements that would be nice
 

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I hear you, it takes a lot of shed space to fit equipment and we certainly don't have enough shed space. I wish we had a shed to pull the highway tractors and the trailers into as one of many examples. Fortunately we have a spot for the swather and combines and headers and air drill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I hear you, it takes a lot of shed space to fit equipment and we certainly don't have enough shed space. I wish we had a shed to pull the highway tractors and the trailers into as one of many examples. Fortunately we have a spot for the swather and combines and headers and air drill.
If I had a list of the implements we have on here I would be so long lol. We have mostly been trying upgrade some of our more important equipment or outright buy something that we’ve needed outright for a long time. For example we have been spreading fertilizer for god knows how long and this year finally got an 8 ton spreader instead of have to go back and forth to the fertilizer facility and now won’t have to hire the floater truck. And other things we have like our cultivator form the 80s still gets the job done that not as much precision is needed. Just need to change sweeps on that every now and then and that’s about it. Also have niche things like a noble blade, chain harrows for breaking up manure after turing cows into the field for grazing, a homemade aerator. And they all have there place. We hadn’t used our harrow packer for 5 years prior to last and year we used it after we blew on alfalfa with our neighbors valmar and then this used the harrow packer on some ripped out alfalfa, then irrigated, then got some canola custom seeded into the firmed up seed bed. Everything has its place that’s for sure
 

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Wherever a drop or 2 of diesel lands when you are filling fuel seems to brighten up the paint. Maybe a good diesel shower would spruce things up. And the best part is once a good coating of dust sticks to the diesel it will block out the sun from baking the paint.
 

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Vice Grip Garage's famous "shine juice" is basically a 1:1 mix of mineral spirits and linseed oil. Makes things look really nice for a few minutes until it gets coated with dust. And is all washed off in a few days.
 

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not exactly what I used but if you’re new to this try searching this website. Get a decent random orbital and the polishes, compounds etc.
good luck
 

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I have done a few pieces of equipment with same results as the pictures. Painted steel or fiberglass with same results. Two step cut and polish then a sealer. Random orbit polisher, foam pads, etc. Done vehicles also and never burned any paint. It's farm equipment, if you are going to damage paint then there is no better place to do it. I suppose I could burn some if I really put a good effort into accomplishing that goal.

Years ago I ordered a bunch of supplies from an online distributor in Canada and use the Chemical Guys brand, something like a 2.5 for rougher cut, then a fine polish with recommended pads for each one. I haven't resealed/waxed since doing this work a few years earlier. Probably should but it is not high on my to do list.

I don't have enough hours in my life to dedicate to polishing farm equipment so wearing down the paint is never going to happen.
 
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