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I'm trying to put a value on a working, wooden crib, 1966, 5000 tonne grain elevator, its in good shape. (It has no rail access).

Has anyone purchased something like this?

Price estimate, for all those who would hazard a guess?

Seller is a retiring farmer.
 

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The seller probably bought it for $1. That's what they used to go for in my area, the lease or purchase of the land was the expensive part. If you didn't want the land you got a running elevator that you had to salvage for one dollar.
 

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The value of the elevator is all based on condition of the structure and where it is situated to your farm. With proper maintenance it should be worth quite a bit. Just like any wood building keeping the weather out is critical. It will also depend on what equipment it has in it. What type of scale does it have? Are the bins all fully hoppered? Is there a good cleaner etc. We have three elevators and they are great farm storage. They are all quite a bit newer though. Sure are great to use at harvest. Anything you could buy for a dollar isn't worth 2 cents...........:mad:
 

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Anything you could buy for a dollar isn't worth 2 cents...........:mad:
The reason you can buy them for a dollar is because it would otherwise cost them to tear it down and demolish it. Years ago two friends of mine by Redwater were thinking of buying the UGG that was right in Ft Sask, price $1.00, plus a $100,000 bond refunded after it was moved and foundations dug out successfully. And proof of I believe it was 10 million liability to CN as it was situated obviously on the railroad property. This was mid 80's, bid to move it was well into six digits, they passed on the whole affair.

I've heard insurance can be an issue, but I'm not sure if that's on leased ones on the rail property or privately owned:confused:
 

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I've heard insurance can be an issue, but I'm not sure if that's on leased ones on the rail property or privately owned:confused:
I have heard the same thing.... insurance premiums are outrageous, as they have a tendancy to burn down. I understand that only the building is insured as well, and not the grain in the elevator.
 

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fellow in vermilion ab got old pool nice shape for 13000?? moved 6 miles for 70000??? added some big hoppers says it is very nice to use. insurance must be expensive
 

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I have heard the same thing.... insurance premiums are outrageous, as they have a tendancy to burn down. I understand that only the building is insured as well, and not the grain in the elevator.
I think a lot has to do with where it's located. Only one I know anything about personally was one a friend had, was the oldest in town, east of the one now a museum and still standing, and was situated right on the CN main line thru Spruce Grove. I have the copy of the local paper of when it burnt, sometime early 90's, made the front cover, but where it got really expensive was that it ended up blocking the main line for a time, not only while it burnt, but until they could get in to clear the tracks. There was a bunch of legal wrangling going on afterwards involving lawyers and insurance, not over the building or grain inside it, but to do with CN. Unfortunately like so many others, Bruce is no longer with us for many years now, and my memory is a bit sketchy on details, but it wasn't a good situation. As I write this I'm questioning myself if he was leasing it from AWP or if he possibly owned it:confused::eek:
 

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I think a lot has to do with where it's located. Only one I know anything about personally was one a friend had, was the oldest in town, east of the one now a museum and still standing, and was situated right on the CN main line thru Spruce Grove. I have the copy of the local paper of when it burnt, sometime early 90's, made the front cover, but where it got really expensive was that it ended up blocking the main line for a time, not only while it burnt, but until they could get in to clear the tracks. There was a bunch of legal wrangling going on afterwards involving lawyers and insurance, not over the building or grain inside it, but to do with CN. Unfortunately like so many others, Bruce is no longer with us for many years now, and my memory is a bit sketchy on details, but it wasn't a good situation. As I write this I'm questioning myself if he was leasing it from AWP or if he possibly owned it:confused::eek:
HMMMMM, where have we heard about problems involving co-operative spirit dealing with CN???
Back on topic, condition of the elevator and all the legs and conveyors etc. would be key. It all comes down to what it costs to keep it running. It does not have to be in mint condition for farm use , but it needs to be reliable. Water in the pit and boot can be a nightmare when you do not use it every day. That might require an update like raising the bottom of the leg above grade and feeding it with a new conveyor from a location that can handle modern trucks. Or just a whole new watertight pit. I bought some of that old Alberta Wheat Pool stuff and it is VERY HD equipment that will last a long time in a once or twice a year movement situation. Some of the benefits of the handling system would be:
-pit for fast unloading in harvest and you can dump a load, get a good sample and then decide which bin to put it in. With a little automation you can then head back to the field while it elevates.
- incorporating a dryer or cleaner is a great bonus
-turning and blending grain is so much easier
-There are advantages to having your grain in a bin and in your yard or at least in one place. Is it possible to load out cars where it is? The rail companies have that all blocked with their penalties for a less than 100 car spot likely. I know of one newer system right on the main line that is for sale. That would be a guess why?
Check out the price of a new grain handling system , all set up. My guess today would be $4-6 / bushel depending on size, options, and level of automation. Site and services would likely be above that. You might be surprised how affordable one of those old elevators is if you are willing to do the logistics of getting it set up and the maintenance yourself. It still has to pay its way though?? Good luck and let us know how you progress.
Sorry, I see you are not on a rail line. Just a flat price quote? Could be a crazy wide range depending who wants it? I bid just over $3000 on 2 -540T bins with conveyors and sweeps and got them. Had from Dec 31 to Jan 31 to move them!! Some stress involved!
 

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If its in working condition i would say around 20-30,000. Does the land underneath it come with?
 

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If you buy the elevator and decide to leave it on the same land (purchase the land too) remember that when the sale is made you will be taking on all environmental risks with the land. For example, if back in the day there was a chem shed/oil shed on the property and there was a big spill, if anyone came in and did a soil sample and found contamination while you own it you will be the one paying to clean it up. Thats why you see all the old UGG and Esso, and SWP NH3 sites with the fences up all over. Nobody wants to buy those 2 acre parcels because of the environmental risk.
Also, some of the older elevator driveway doors are too small for today's semis.
Just a few thoughts.
 
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