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Going to seed some yellow peas for next year, have never grown them before.

Any seed treatment recommendations to put on the seed or is a guy good to just stick them in? Going on wheat stubble on a clean field.

Thanks
 

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If seed has low or no disease no treatment is probably the best option if u got cracked seed coats it can help but I’ve never shown a return on using it
 

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Before aware that if you treat with Insure Pulse you must use granular innoculant. Cannot use use peat or liquid
 

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I’ve done a zillion trials with seed treatments and the best return was where there was none. The cost to treat peas is immense. Yes, pea prices are good now, but with that I’m sure the companies will be hiking the price of the seed treatment ... just like everything else.
 

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I did a granular inoculant trial this year on yellow peas if you are interested. Not the best year due to the drought but still some interesting results

Celltech 24.3
AGTIV. 23.8
Lalfix. 23.8
Nodulator 23.5
Tagteam Bio 23.8
Tagteam LCO 23.1
No inoculant 22.4
 

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I did a granular inoculant trial this year on yellow peas if you are interested. Not the best year due to the drought but still some interesting results

Celltech 24.3
AGTIV. 23.8
Lalfix. 23.8
Nodulator 23.5
Tagteam Bio 23.8
Tagteam LCO 23.1
No inoculant 22.4
That’s a lot of work, good on you to do so many innoculants. I did the two Tagteams and seen zero difference in yield. Funny thing Bio is $30 more per bag.
Granular innoculant is priced higher because of its convenience, and it sure is convenient. Wonder how much it will be for spring?

One question, where no innoculant wasn’t used did you see any difference in color or plant height?
I would bet you had nodules on the roots from rhizobium in the ground if you have been growing a lot of pulses?
 

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That’s a lot of work, good on you to do so many innoculants. I did the two Tagteams and seen zero difference in yield. Funny thing Bio is $30 more per bag.
Granular innoculant is priced higher because of its convenience, and it sure is convenient. Wonder how much it will be for spring?

One question, where no innoculant wasn’t used did you see any difference in color or plant height?
I would bet you had nodules on the roots from rhizobium in the ground if you have been growing a lot of pulses?
Yeah it was a lot of work just wish it was a better year. Lol. Didn't see any differences in Height, color or maturity between the different plots. Last time there was peas on this field was 2010. The no inoculant plot suprisingly still had a good amount of nodules.
 

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Yeah it was a lot of work just wish it was a better year. Lol. Didn't see any differences in Height, color or maturity between the different plots. Last time there was peas on this field was 2010. The no inoculant plot suprisingly still had a good amount of nodules.
Could still be alittle inoculant in the air lines if the plots weren’t that big. Unless the no inoculant was seeded first.
 

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After running this trial, what inoculant are you going to use this coming year? I would wonder if there would be any statistical difference in any of the results.
 

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From what I understand the rhizobium that inoculates peas is natural to some soils probably why I'm still seeing nodules on the no inoculant plot.
I've had inoculant mishaps in the past, on virgin pea ground, where I could see no visible differences which made me wonder if commercial inoculant is required at all. This is half the reason I did this trial to begin with.

Kinda glad the no inoculant plot was the lowest yielding so it makes me feel better that I wasn't wasting my money over the years

In conclusion.. I'll be sticking with the cheapest inoculant I can find. In this case... Cell-tech.
 

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From what I understand the rhizobium that inoculates peas is natural to some soils probably why I'm still seeing nodules on the no inoculant plot.
I've had inoculant mishaps in the past, on virgin pea ground, where I could see no visible differences which made me wonder if commercial inoculant is required at all. This is half the reason I did this trial to begin with.

Kinda glad the no inoculant plot was the lowest yielding so it makes me feel better that I wasn't wasting my money over the years

In conclusion.. I'll be sticking with the cheapest inoculant I can find. In this case... Cell-tech.
Good info.
I have been using the cheapest as well...Cell-tech, for years. Applied by a custom applicator with polymer.
Tested side by side with couple of others you mentioned. My testing was combine yield monitor only, lazy mans method. Saw no difference in yield. Stayed with cell-tech.
 

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I used Nodulator granular this year and for the hell of it I turned off the inoculant for the last 100 feet on 1 pass. Not enough to get a yield test but the results could be seen from the road. And it kind of proves that inoculant doesn't stick inside the hoses much.



Innoculant VS No Innoculant. Nodulator granular on virgin pea ground. July 2021

Road surface Organism Terrestrial plant Asphalt Twig
 
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