The Combine Forum banner

61 - 74 of 74 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,647 Posts
Push my combines to full capacity, I put all of my grain in the hopper, undamaged mind you and regardless of what ever capacity you have over me each one of my combines pays for itself again as you reach 5-6 more hours in depreciation.

There is a lot of ways to skin a cat but making payments on a new combine with less loss is a pipe dream. Just like fuel savings and a new tractor.

Oh by the way as someone told me the other day a new combine is more comfortable, the only thing that makes my combine uncomfortable is thickness of my wallet from all that saved money.
But the argument is on combines that cost the same...and one is throwing 1-2bu more out the back then the other it is close to making the payment.

I’m sure you push yours to capacity. The problem is lots of guys push them to engine power limit not combine capacity which on most machines isn’t the same.

It would take 3-4 of your combines to match our one in our conditions. We don’t have the man power or the time to fix them ourselves. Nothing wrong with how you operate if it works for you. We have ran the numbers and it doesn’t work for us.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,181 Posts
Well if they throw out 5 bu / acre they probably not smart enough to operate a Claas
You are quite possibly right. I guess I was lucky because someone showed me and I wasn't afraid to change.

Push my combines to full capacity, I put all of my grain in the hopper, undamaged mind you and regardless of what ever capacity you have over me each one of my combines pays for itself again as you reach 5-6 more hours in depreciation.

There is a lot of ways to skin a cat but making payments on a new combine with less loss is a pipe dream. Just like fuel savings and a new tractor.

Oh by the way as someone told me the other day a new combine is more comfortable, the only thing that makes my combine uncomfortable is thickness of my wallet from all that saved money.
I had 1680's and they were just fine for being comfortable as far as I was concerned. However it would take 3 to do what I am doing with one combine now and under some conditions it wouldn't even turn a wheel. Plus the straw chopper and spreader was junk compared to what is available currently.

I bet you don't put ALL the grain in the hopper, nobody does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,477 Posts
Another colour isn't out of the question. Would like to be around that 1500-1800 separator hours. Not scared to try something new. Pretty much have all colours around within 50kms for dealer service. Each machine should only be doing approx 150hrs a year. Already run a cart and have potential man power around. Don't have a dryer just heated Aeration. 2nd combine is the answer and the question at hand.
Figured I would just throw it out there hypothetically if you had $250k to spend what's in your line up.
I'll join the guys in the used 9770 camp. I traded off a Lexion on a new 2013 9770 and have never been happier during harvest. I drive truck and when I'm in the field with no load I walk behind combines. We had many 9600s over the years and yes they threw cereals and canola like crazy if you pushed them. I have not noticed that with the 9770. For several years we left straw in windrows on a couple quarters for a dairy and I walked 5 miles a day if I had enough help, behind the machines because I was interested. I grew alfalfa and trefoil seed for years and knew how fast you could lose money out the back of a combine so I was VERY interested. I never saw the results that people say they see with Lexion vs Deere and I had them both back to back. Probably because I never push them hard enough to see it. THE FACT that you will have two combines doing the job you now do with one will mean you aren't pushing like SW with his 450,000 bushels through one machine. You will be just going to work and diligently picking up your crop at a reasonable speed because you will now have the combine capacity to take your time. I didn't say stop for supper LOL. Just don't push the combines too hard. That in my view negates any advantage of owning a million dollar combine of any colour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
...
It would take 3-4 of your combines to match our one in our conditions. We don’t have the man power or the time to fix them ourselves. Nothing wrong with how you operate if it works for you. We have ran the numbers and it doesn’t work for us.
Which 4 combines are you talking about?

I would be willing to bet a nice steak supper 4 small combines will blow the doors off a pumped up claas 780.
Even If you pitted 4 9600's or TX66's against one 780, there would be no contest, that 780 would get smoked!
With all running at capacity (regarding losses) let's say you combined 20ft swaths and added 4 of them together, do you honestly think a 9600 in a 20ft swath would be going slower than a 780 in an 80ft swath?
Me thinks no.. by a landslide!

Realistically that claas 780 is maybe 2 9600's.

I don't doubt the claas 700's are great machines, but here they cost a lot new (way more than everyone else) and the service is literally non-existent. Oh yea, and parts are just as non-existent, so just about no one runs them here.

But no way my s series machines are pumping out 5bu/acre. Only way that would happen is if I ignored the meters and pushed the stick as much as the engine could handle. I had some t-670 machines, I thought they are actually a great machine for its size (European built/designed), but we just simply out grew them and buying more wasn't the answer, just didn't have that kind of manpower.


To the OP, just buy the same as what you have, or a smaller one in the same series, so operations are simple, guys are familiar, and most spare parts are similar. I used to run different brands for a few years, it was a pain, as they each have their quirks and junk, also this way every header can be mixed and matched, nothing worse then having a header that can't fit the other machine when one is broken or not around.
JMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,647 Posts
Which 4 combines are you talking about?

I would be willing to bet a nice steak supper 4 small combines will blow the doors off a pumped up claas 780.
Even If you pitted 4 9600's or TX66's against one 780, there would be no contest, that 780 would get smoked!
With all running at capacity (regarding losses) let's say you combined 20ft swaths and added 4 of them together, do you honestly think a 9600 in a 20ft swath would be going slower than a 780 in an 80ft swath?
Me thinks no.. by a landslide!

Realistically that claas 780 is maybe 2 9600's.

I don't doubt the claas 700's are great machines, but here they cost a lot new (way more than everyone else) and the service is literally non-existent. Oh yea, and parts are just as non-existent, so just about no one runs them here.

But no way my s series machines are pumping out 5bu/acre. Only way that would happen is if I ignored the meters and pushed the stick as much as the engine could handle. I had some t-670 machines, I thought they are actually a great machine for its size (European built/designed), but we just simply out grew them and buying more wasn't the answer, just didn't have that kind of manpower.


To the OP, just buy the same as what you have, or a smaller one in the same series, so operations are simple, guys are familiar, and most spare parts are similar. I used to run different brands for a few years, it was a pain, as they each have their quirks and junk, also this way every header can be mixed and matched, nothing worse then having a header that can't fit the other machine when one is broken or not around.
JMO.
If I can pick conditions I will take your bet. In tough oat straw our 780 was over twice the capacity of our cr9090(178a-85a) .they are the same horsepower. Most days we are 1.5 times more acres then the CR in oats. Swfarm was taking about his combines. Souped up 1480s? Maybe 1680s
No idea how fast I could go in a 80' swath but I know how fast a 9600 goes in a heavy damp 36' canola swath.....

I do know some guys who don't look at what is going out the back. They adjust the loss to what looks good on the monitor and drive as fast as the combine lets them.
700 claas cost almost the same cash price as any other colour new. Parts and service is the same or better then New holland for us and I can't complain about the new holland dealer.

I do agree with you that the OP should run the same brand as what he has unless he wants to try something else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,740 Posts
I had 1680's and they were just fine for being comfortable as far as I was concerned. However it would take 3 to do what I am doing with one combine now and under some conditions it wouldn't even turn a wheel.

I bet you don't put ALL the grain in the hopper, nobody does.
Well I know Canadians endure the worst harvest conditions in the world but some people raise Durum making even fair weather at times difficult. I know you wouldn't have ever considered cutting 30+ moisture with a stock 1680 and nor would the average farmer modify one to handle it either.

I can average 70 acres a day in these conditions per combine with loses between 3-10 seeds of durum per square foot.
21 seeds per square foot in wheat and 17 seeds in durum on average is 1 bu per acre.

You mentioned 5 bu losses, I don't believe it for a second, in wheat that's approaching a seed per square inch, I think a full bu would make the average farmer sick, 105 seeds per square foot would make you puke.
There is no condition or combine that should ever perform so poorly. Not even a 9600

There would be so much grain coming out of your combine you would sandblast the side of your grain cart and tractor.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,181 Posts
I can average 70 acres a day in these conditions per combine with loses between 3-10 seeds of durum per acre.
21 seeds per square foot in wheat and 17 seeds in durum on average is 1 bu per acre.

You mentioned 5 bu losses, I don't believe it for a second, in wheat that's approaching a seed per square inch, I think a full bu would make the average farmer sick, 105 seeds per square foot would make you puke.
There is no condition or combine that should ever perform so poorly. Not even a 9600

There would be so much grain coming out of your combine you would sandblast the side of your grain cart and tractor.
Seriously man, you counted the durum seeds in a whole acre??? I call BS!

I mentioned 5 but I have seen 10....a few times.

For anyone who finds this hard to believe I go back to my original advice on this thread, just buy a grain loss pan and do some checking. With some crops you simply can't look on the ground and know what's going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,740 Posts
Seriously man, you counted the durum seeds in a whole acre??? I call BS!

I mentioned 5 but I have seen 10....a few times.
Who said anything about counting durum seeds in an acre, count them in a square foot.
You dont need a pan if you have ever done a seed count so you know how much to plant.

You have seen more than a seed per square inch on the ground and it wasn't hailed out? Or some other act of nature, Come on....... That's just dumb. I dont believe for a second anyone could get the crop in the ground and fail so bad at harvest.

You think your the only farmer that knows how to set a combine, give me a break.

My bad, I did accidentally put an an acre.....
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,028 Posts
I mentioned 5 (bu) but I have seen 10 (bu)....a few times.
While both are too high reguardless of yield % loss is more important.

PAMI established 3% loss as the high benchmark...in the early 1970’s that is.
Fundamentally harvesting equipment hadn’t changed in 50+ years at that point.
Then came the ‘70’s and by the end of the decade four fundamentally different systems hit the market.
By the time testing ended in the early 1990’s sentiment seem to be 1% was now relatively attainable and perhaps a better benchmark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,802 Posts
Well I know Canadians endure the worst harvest conditions in the world but some people raise Durum making even fair weather at times difficult. I know you wouldn't have ever considered cutting 30+ moisture with a stock 1680 and nor would the average farmer modify one to handle it either.
That stuff looks like porridge, or something in a pigs trough. Looks like pretty tough conditions to put a combine in, that should have gave it a workout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
We thrown pans under our 9870 and came to conclusion the 3/4 percent more dockage wasnt worth throwing 4 bushels out the back for. Always furiates me not being able to set it perfect in canola. But when switching to beans and corn its all forgotten already
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Ok here is the scenario:
You have $250k to buy the farm a 2nd combine & a 30-35ft rigid straight cut header.
What do you buy ?
Your only harvesting wheat,canola & barley
:sFun_mischieviousbi
Nothing if you don't need it. :) It is double the maintenance and operation costs. Obviously, you pulled in an extra 250k without it. I would question the need for it.

There may be other places to save time/money in your operation, like solar grain driers, autonomous grain carts, etc.

Or you can hold the money in other investments until you actually need it to buy a new combine.
 
61 - 74 of 74 Posts
Top